Toxaemia of pregnancy and risk of mortality in later life: evidence from the Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study

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Abstract

Objective. To examine whether toxaemia of pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of mortality, in particular premature death. Methods. A cohort nested within the Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study focusing on women who never used oral contraceptives. A total of 2865 parous women with a history of toxaemia of pregnancy were compared with 11,460 parous women without such a history. Adjusted hazards ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for death from all causes, vascular disease and cancer. Risk of premature death before the age of 65 years was compared between the two groups. Results. Women with a history of toxaemia had a significant increased risk of death from any cause (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.04-1.39) and from vascular disease (adjusted HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05-1.82). Women with a history of toxaemia who did not subsequently develop hypertension or vascular disease had significantly increased risks of all-cause and vascular mortality. These risks were not found among women who developed these conditions. Toxaemia of pregnancy was not associated with premature death. Conclusion. Toxaemia of pregnancy was associated with increased mortality but not premature death.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)180-197
Number of pages18
JournalHypertension in Pregnancy
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Pre-Eclampsia
Contraception
General Practitioners
Premature Mortality
Mortality
Vascular Diseases
Toxemia
Cause of Death
Oral Contraceptives
Blood Vessels
History
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • cardiovascular diseases
  • cohort
  • mortality
  • preeclampsia
  • women

Cite this

@article{dce1fff02c5f4e55bc101269c0159039,
title = "Toxaemia of pregnancy and risk of mortality in later life: evidence from the Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study",
abstract = "Objective. To examine whether toxaemia of pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of mortality, in particular premature death. Methods. A cohort nested within the Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study focusing on women who never used oral contraceptives. A total of 2865 parous women with a history of toxaemia of pregnancy were compared with 11,460 parous women without such a history. Adjusted hazards ratios and 95{\%} confidence intervals were calculated for death from all causes, vascular disease and cancer. Risk of premature death before the age of 65 years was compared between the two groups. Results. Women with a history of toxaemia had a significant increased risk of death from any cause (adjusted HR 1.20, 95{\%} CI 1.04-1.39) and from vascular disease (adjusted HR 1.38, 95{\%} CI 1.05-1.82). Women with a history of toxaemia who did not subsequently develop hypertension or vascular disease had significantly increased risks of all-cause and vascular mortality. These risks were not found among women who developed these conditions. Toxaemia of pregnancy was not associated with premature death. Conclusion. Toxaemia of pregnancy was associated with increased mortality but not premature death.",
keywords = "cardiovascular diseases, cohort, mortality, preeclampsia, women",
author = "Lisa Iversen and Hannaford, {Philip C}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.3109/10641950902968643",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "180--197",
journal = "Hypertension in Pregnancy",
issn = "1064-1955",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Toxaemia of pregnancy and risk of mortality in later life

T2 - evidence from the Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study

AU - Iversen, Lisa

AU - Hannaford, Philip C

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Objective. To examine whether toxaemia of pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of mortality, in particular premature death. Methods. A cohort nested within the Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study focusing on women who never used oral contraceptives. A total of 2865 parous women with a history of toxaemia of pregnancy were compared with 11,460 parous women without such a history. Adjusted hazards ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for death from all causes, vascular disease and cancer. Risk of premature death before the age of 65 years was compared between the two groups. Results. Women with a history of toxaemia had a significant increased risk of death from any cause (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.04-1.39) and from vascular disease (adjusted HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05-1.82). Women with a history of toxaemia who did not subsequently develop hypertension or vascular disease had significantly increased risks of all-cause and vascular mortality. These risks were not found among women who developed these conditions. Toxaemia of pregnancy was not associated with premature death. Conclusion. Toxaemia of pregnancy was associated with increased mortality but not premature death.

AB - Objective. To examine whether toxaemia of pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of mortality, in particular premature death. Methods. A cohort nested within the Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study focusing on women who never used oral contraceptives. A total of 2865 parous women with a history of toxaemia of pregnancy were compared with 11,460 parous women without such a history. Adjusted hazards ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for death from all causes, vascular disease and cancer. Risk of premature death before the age of 65 years was compared between the two groups. Results. Women with a history of toxaemia had a significant increased risk of death from any cause (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.04-1.39) and from vascular disease (adjusted HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05-1.82). Women with a history of toxaemia who did not subsequently develop hypertension or vascular disease had significantly increased risks of all-cause and vascular mortality. These risks were not found among women who developed these conditions. Toxaemia of pregnancy was not associated with premature death. Conclusion. Toxaemia of pregnancy was associated with increased mortality but not premature death.

KW - cardiovascular diseases

KW - cohort

KW - mortality

KW - preeclampsia

KW - women

U2 - 10.3109/10641950902968643

DO - 10.3109/10641950902968643

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 180

EP - 197

JO - Hypertension in Pregnancy

JF - Hypertension in Pregnancy

SN - 1064-1955

IS - 2

ER -