Tracing Internet Path Transparency

Mirja Kuehlewind, Michael Walter, Iain Learmonth, Brian Trammell

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Abstract

Investigating Internet Path Transparency means measuring if a network path between two endhosts is impaired by in-network functions on the path. A path is considered transparent if it provides connectivity and the same performance independent of the protocol or protocol stack that is used for the transmission. Unfortunately this is not always the case. Simple firewalls that block e.g. UDP, are an example. Of course such in-network functions are often valuable, like firewalls. However, these middleboxes also, sometimes unintentionally, make assumptions about the traffic passing through them that restricts innovation in the Internet on the higher layers, e.g. the deployment of new UDP-based protocols such as QUIC, to stick with the previous example.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018
EventNetwork Traffic Measurement and Analysis Conference - Vienna, Austria
Duration: 26 Jun 201829 Jun 2018

Conference

ConferenceNetwork Traffic Measurement and Analysis Conference
Abbreviated titleTMA CONFERENCE 2018
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period26/06/1829/06/18

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Transparency
Internet
Network protocols
Innovation

Cite this

Kuehlewind, M., Walter, M., Learmonth, I., & Trammell, B. (2018). Tracing Internet Path Transparency. Paper presented at Network Traffic Measurement and Analysis Conference, Vienna, Austria.

Tracing Internet Path Transparency. / Kuehlewind, Mirja; Walter, Michael; Learmonth, Iain; Trammell, Brian.

2018. Paper presented at Network Traffic Measurement and Analysis Conference, Vienna, Austria.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Kuehlewind, M, Walter, M, Learmonth, I & Trammell, B 2018, 'Tracing Internet Path Transparency' Paper presented at Network Traffic Measurement and Analysis Conference, Vienna, Austria, 26/06/18 - 29/06/18, .
Kuehlewind M, Walter M, Learmonth I, Trammell B. Tracing Internet Path Transparency. 2018. Paper presented at Network Traffic Measurement and Analysis Conference, Vienna, Austria.
Kuehlewind, Mirja ; Walter, Michael ; Learmonth, Iain ; Trammell, Brian. / Tracing Internet Path Transparency. Paper presented at Network Traffic Measurement and Analysis Conference, Vienna, Austria.7 p.
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