Transparency in the reporting of in vivo pre-clinical pain research

The relevance and implications of the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) guidelines

Andrew S.C. Rice, Rosemary Morland, Wenlong Huang, Gillian L. Currie, Emily S. Sena, Malcom R. Macleod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clear reporting of research is crucial to the scientific process. Poorly designed and reported studies are damaging not only to the efforts of individual researchers, but also to science as a whole. Standardised reporting methods, such as those already established for reporting randomised clinical trials, have led to improved study design and facilitated the processes of clinical systematic review and meta-analysis.

Such standards were lacking in the pre-clinical field until the development of the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) guidelines. These were prompted following a survey which highlighted a widespread lack of robust and consistent reporting of pre-clinical in vivo research, with reports frequently omitting basic information required for study replication and quality assessment.

The resulting twenty item checklist in ARRIVE covers all aspects of experimental design with particular emphasis on bias reduction and methodological transparency. Influential publishers and research funders have already adopted ARRIVE. Further dissemination and acknowledgement of the importance of these guidelines is vital to their widespread implementation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-62
Number of pages5
JournalScandinavian Journal of Pain
Volume4
Issue number2
Early online date18 Mar 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

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Keywords

  • in vivo research
  • preclinical research
  • publication guidleines
  • CONSORT-guidelines
  • ARRIVE-guidelines

Cite this

Transparency in the reporting of in vivo pre-clinical pain research : The relevance and implications of the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) guidelines. / Rice, Andrew S.C.; Morland, Rosemary; Huang, Wenlong; Currie, Gillian L.; Sena, Emily S.; Macleod, Malcom R.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Vol. 4, No. 2, 04.2013, p. 58-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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