Travelling through a warming world: Climate change and migratory species

R.A. Robinson, H.Q.P. Crick, I.M.D. Maclean, M.M. Rehfisch, J.A. Learmonth, G.J. Pierce, M. Begoña Santos, C.D. Thomas, F. Bairlein, M.C. Forchhammer, C.M. Francis, J.A. Gill, B.J. Godley, J. Harwood, G.C. Hays, B. Huntley, A.M. Hutson, D.W. Sims, T.H. Sparks, D.A. StroudM.E. Visser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

168 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-distance migrations are among the wonders of the natural world, but this multitaxon review shows that the characteristics of species that undertake such movements appear to make them particularly vulnerable to detrimental impacts of climate change. Migrants are key components of biological systems in high latitude regions, where the speed and magnitude of climate change impacts are greatest. They also rely on highly productive seasonal habitats, including wetlands and ocean upwellings that, with climate change, may become less food-rich and predictable in space and time. While migrants are adapted to adjust their behaviour with annual changes in the weather, the decoupling of climatic variables between geographically separate breeding and nonbreeding grounds is beginning to result in mistimed migration. Furthermore, human land-use and activity patterns will constrain the ability of many species to modify their migratory routes and may increase the stress induced by climate change. Adapting conservation strategies for migrants in the light of climate change will require substantial shifts in site designation policies, flexibility of management strategies and the integration of forward planning for both people and wildlife. While adaptation to changes may be feasible for some terrestrial systems, wildlife in the marine ecosystem may be more dependent on the degree of climate change mitigation that is achievable.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-99
Number of pages13
JournalEndangered Species Research
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2009

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migratory species
warming
climate change
migration route
activity pattern
marine ecosystem
upwelling
wetland
breeding
world
weather
land use
food
ocean
habitat

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Robinson, R. A., Crick, H. Q. P., Maclean, I. M. D., Rehfisch, M. M., Learmonth, J. A., Pierce, G. J., ... Visser, M. E. (2009). Travelling through a warming world: Climate change and migratory species. Endangered Species Research, 7(2), 87-99. https://doi.org/10.3354/esr00095

Travelling through a warming world : Climate change and migratory species. / Robinson, R.A.; Crick, H.Q.P.; Maclean, I.M.D.; Rehfisch, M.M.; Learmonth, J.A.; Pierce, G.J.; Begoña Santos, M.; Thomas, C.D.; Bairlein, F.; Forchhammer, M.C.; Francis, C.M.; Gill, J.A.; Godley, B.J.; Harwood, J.; Hays, G.C.; Huntley, B.; Hutson, A.M.; Sims, D.W.; Sparks, T.H.; Stroud, D.A.; Visser, M.E.

In: Endangered Species Research, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.01.2009, p. 87-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robinson, RA, Crick, HQP, Maclean, IMD, Rehfisch, MM, Learmonth, JA, Pierce, GJ, Begoña Santos, M, Thomas, CD, Bairlein, F, Forchhammer, MC, Francis, CM, Gill, JA, Godley, BJ, Harwood, J, Hays, GC, Huntley, B, Hutson, AM, Sims, DW, Sparks, TH, Stroud, DA & Visser, ME 2009, 'Travelling through a warming world: Climate change and migratory species', Endangered Species Research, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 87-99. https://doi.org/10.3354/esr00095
Robinson RA, Crick HQP, Maclean IMD, Rehfisch MM, Learmonth JA, Pierce GJ et al. Travelling through a warming world: Climate change and migratory species. Endangered Species Research. 2009 Jan 1;7(2):87-99. https://doi.org/10.3354/esr00095
Robinson, R.A. ; Crick, H.Q.P. ; Maclean, I.M.D. ; Rehfisch, M.M. ; Learmonth, J.A. ; Pierce, G.J. ; Begoña Santos, M. ; Thomas, C.D. ; Bairlein, F. ; Forchhammer, M.C. ; Francis, C.M. ; Gill, J.A. ; Godley, B.J. ; Harwood, J. ; Hays, G.C. ; Huntley, B. ; Hutson, A.M. ; Sims, D.W. ; Sparks, T.H. ; Stroud, D.A. ; Visser, M.E. / Travelling through a warming world : Climate change and migratory species. In: Endangered Species Research. 2009 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 87-99.
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