Tsetse fly saliva biases the immune response to Th2 and induces anti-vector antibodies that are a useful tool for exposure asessment

G. Caljon, J. Van Den Abbele, Jeremy M Sternberg, M. Coosemans, P. De Baetselier, S. Magez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tsetse flies (Glossina sp.) are blood-feeding dipteran insects that transmit African trypanosomes, parasites that are responsible for human sleeping sickness and veterinary infections. Increasing attention is being paid to the effects of tsetse fly saliva deposited at the feeding site, which enables the blood-feeding process and putatively promotes parasite transmission. Here we demonstrate! that saliva induces strong Immoral responses against the major 43-45 kDa protein fraction (tsetse salivary gland proteins 1 and 2-Tsal1 and Tsal2) in mice and humans and suppresses murine T and B cell responses to heterologous antigen. The saliva-induced immune response is associated with a Th2-biased cytokine profile and the production of mainly IgG1 and IgE antibody isotypes. Functionally, the antibodies raised in mice exposed to tsetse fly bites or induced after experimental saliva immunisation do not affect the fly's blood-feeding efficiency nor its survival. We propose that anti-saliva as well as anti-Tsal1/2 antibody responses can be used in epidemiological studies as a tool to analyze human exposure to tsetse flies. (c) 2006 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1025-1035
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal for Parasitology
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Glossina
  • vector-host interaction
  • immune modulation
  • T-helper cell type 2
  • antibodies
  • GLOSSINA-MORSITANS-MORSITANS
  • CD4(+) T-CELLS
  • LUTZOMYIA-LONGIPALPIS
  • CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS
  • PHENOTYPE DEVELOPMENT
  • AFRICAN TRYPANOSOMES
  • CYTOKINE RESPONSES
  • SLEEPING SICKNESS
  • INTERFERON-GAMMA
  • TRANSGENIC MODEL

Cite this

Tsetse fly saliva biases the immune response to Th2 and induces anti-vector antibodies that are a useful tool for exposure asessment. / Caljon, G.; Van Den Abbele, J.; Sternberg, Jeremy M; Coosemans, M.; De Baetselier, P.; Magez, S.

In: International Journal for Parasitology, Vol. 36, 2006, p. 1025-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - De Baetselier, P.

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