Understanding local patterns of genetic diversity in dipterocarps using a multi-site, multi-species approach

Implications for forest management and restoration

C. Tito de Morais*, J. Ghazoul, C. R. Maycock, R. Bagchi, D F R P Burslem, E. Khoo, A. Itoh, S. Nanami, Shuhei Matsuyama, A. Finger, S. A. Ismail, C. J. Kettle

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The lowland tropical forests of Southeast Asia are dominated by a single family of canopy and emergent trees, the Dipterocarpaceae. The seeds of dipterocarps are gravity or gyration dispersed. Short distance and limited seed dispersal via these mechanisms result in the aggregation of related individuals and strong fine-scale spatial genetic structure (FSGS). In logged and fragmented forests, where gene flow may be disrupted, tree species with strong FSGS are predicted to exhibit increased inbreeding, which consequently can erode genetic diversity, fitness and might limit the potential for natural regeneration of dipterocarps. Developing a set of indirect operational indicators for FSGS provides a solid basis for informing conservation and management of forest genetic resources in logged forests. Our main objective was to use an information theoretic approach to identify these indicators of FSGS in dipterocarps. We quantify FSGS in 19 dipterocarp species across four forest sites in Malaysian Borneo, India and the Seychelles. We detected FSGS in 15 (79%) of our study species, most of which displayed significant inbreeding. Our results suggest that wood density and flower size offer useful indicators of FSGS. We propose some simple guidelines to allow forest managers to account for FSGS when planning approaches to maintain genetically diverse stands in logged dipterocarp forests. The integration of improved understanding of genetic processes is essential for conserving forest tree genetic resources and ensuring the resilience of logged forests.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-165
Number of pages13
JournalForest Ecology and Management
Volume356
Early online date8 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2015

Fingerprint

Dipterocarpaceae
forest restoration
genetic structure
forest management
genetic variation
genetic resource
inbreeding
genetic resources
forest genetics
restoration
genetic diversity
Seychelles
forest resource
seed dispersal
wood density
natural regeneration
lowland forests
Borneo
tropical forest
gene flow

Keywords

  • Dipterocarpaceae
  • Flower size
  • Fragmentation
  • Inbreeding
  • Spatial genetic structure
  • Tropical rain forest
  • Wood density

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Understanding local patterns of genetic diversity in dipterocarps using a multi-site, multi-species approach : Implications for forest management and restoration. / Tito de Morais, C.; Ghazoul, J.; Maycock, C. R.; Bagchi, R.; Burslem, D F R P; Khoo, E.; Itoh, A.; Nanami, S.; Matsuyama, Shuhei; Finger, A.; Ismail, S. A.; Kettle, C. J.

In: Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 356, 15.11.2015, p. 153-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tito de Morais, C, Ghazoul, J, Maycock, CR, Bagchi, R, Burslem, DFRP, Khoo, E, Itoh, A, Nanami, S, Matsuyama, S, Finger, A, Ismail, SA & Kettle, CJ 2015, 'Understanding local patterns of genetic diversity in dipterocarps using a multi-site, multi-species approach: Implications for forest management and restoration', Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 356, pp. 153-165. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2015.07.023
Tito de Morais, C. ; Ghazoul, J. ; Maycock, C. R. ; Bagchi, R. ; Burslem, D F R P ; Khoo, E. ; Itoh, A. ; Nanami, S. ; Matsuyama, Shuhei ; Finger, A. ; Ismail, S. A. ; Kettle, C. J. / Understanding local patterns of genetic diversity in dipterocarps using a multi-site, multi-species approach : Implications for forest management and restoration. In: Forest Ecology and Management. 2015 ; Vol. 356. pp. 153-165.
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