Understanding the Determinants of Volunteer Retention Through Capture-Recapture Analysis

Answering Social Science Questions Using a Wildlife Ecology Toolkit

Christopher Beirne, Xavier Lambin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scientists and conservationists increasingly rely on contributions by volunteers recruited from the wider public to work over large and ecologically meaningful spatial scales. Optimizing working in partnership with unpaid, volunteer citizen scientists and conservationists requires an understanding of the determinants of volunteer retention rates and how they are affected by management practices. To this effect, we present the novel use of the mark-recapture framework widely used in wildlife demography in order to quantify volunteer retention probabilities. We illustrate the versatility and power of the approach using a project that removed invasive American mink from 10,000 km in Scotland in partnership with volunteer citizen conservationists recruited from local communities. Wide scale adoption of the mark-recapture framework to analyze volunteer management will give novel insights into how volunteers interact with the conservation projects they are involved in and provide evidence for their optimal management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-401
Number of pages11
JournalConservation Letters
Volume6
Issue number6
Early online date8 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

social sciences
volunteers
wildlife
ecology
demography
management practice
volunteer management
Neovison vison
Scotland
project
analysis
social science
citizen
effect
rate
public

Keywords

  • citizen conservationist
  • citizen scientist
  • conservation
  • capture recapture
  • retention
  • volunteer

Cite this

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