Unintended Consequences

The Negative Impact of Email Use on Participation and Collective Identity in Two “Horizontal” Social Movement Groups

Cristina Flesher Fominaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relation between face-to-face and online communication and its impact on collective identity processes is understudied. In this article I draw on two case studies conducted during a 3-year ethnographic study of the Global Justice Movement network in Madrid, Spain, from 2002 to 2005 to explore the unintended impact of e-mail on the sustainability, internal dynamics, and collective identity of two groups committed to participatory and deliberative practices as key features of their collective identity. I found that despite an explicit commitment to ‘horizontalism’ the use of e-mail in these two groups increased existing hierarchies, hindered consensus, decreased participation, and worked towards marginalization of group members. In addition, the negative and unintended consequences of e-mail use affected both groups, independently of activists’ evaluation of their experience in their face-to-face assemblies (one of which was overwhelmingly perceived as positive and one of which was perceived as negative). The article draws on e-mail research in organizations, online political deliberation research, and existing studies of e-mail use in social movement groups to analyse these findings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-122
Number of pages28
JournalEuropean Political Science Review
Volume8
Issue number1
Early online date7 Jan 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

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collective identity
social movement
e-mail
participation
Group
deliberation
group membership
Spain
justice
sustainability
commitment
communication
evaluation
experience

Keywords

  • e-mail
  • social movements
  • deliberative democracy
  • Global Justice Movement
  • information and communication technologies (ICTs)
  • organizational communication

Cite this

Unintended Consequences : The Negative Impact of Email Use on Participation and Collective Identity in Two “Horizontal” Social Movement Groups. / Flesher Fominaya, Cristina.

In: European Political Science Review, Vol. 8, No. 1, 02.2016, p. 95-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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