Unwinding the spiral: Discovering the manufacturing method of Iron Age Scottish glass beads

Martina Bertini, Rajmund Mokso, Eva M. Krupp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spiral decorated Iron Age Scottish glass beads are a group of highly decorated objects about which very little is known. Despite considerable debate in the past, their technical complexity and elaborate design have always hindered the understanding of their method of production. The innovative application of X-ray micro-computed-tomography (μCT), with synchrotron light, rendered detailed information of the internal structure of selected artefacts, allowing for the investigation of features relating to manufacture. The 3D imaging not only permitted the identification of characteristic features and markings typical of specific low temperature glass-working techniques, but also added to the evidence for local manufacture and allowed conclusions to be drawn on the pyro-technological development of the ancient communities that produced them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-266
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Archaeological Science
Volume43
Early online date18 Jan 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

technical development
artifact
manufacturing
community
evidence
Group
Glass Beads
Spiral
Iron Age
Manufacturing
Artifact
Low Temperature
Synchrotron
Computed Tomography
Imaging

Keywords

  • Ancient glass beads
  • Ancient pyrotechnologies
  • Glass technology
  • Synchrotron light
  • X-ray microtomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Archaeology

Cite this

Unwinding the spiral : Discovering the manufacturing method of Iron Age Scottish glass beads. / Bertini, Martina; Mokso, Rajmund; Krupp, Eva M.

In: Journal of Archaeological Science, Vol. 43, 03.2014, p. 256-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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