Urban Effects on Participation and Wages

Are there Gender Differences?

Euan Phimister (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper estimates participation and wage equations using panel data from the United Kingdom to explore gender differences in urban wage and participation premiums. The results suggest a small but economically significant urban participation premium for women but none for men. Results from the wage estimations suggest that after controlling for sample selectivity, observed and unobserved heterogeneity, the urban premium is larger for women. This wage premium is also larger for married or cohabiting women relative to others. There is also evidence of higher urban returns to experience for men and lower urban wage depreciation for both men and women. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)513-536
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Urban Economics
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2005

Keywords

  • participation
  • wages
  • urban
  • rural
  • panel
  • sample selection
  • PANEL-DATA MODELS
  • SELECTION BIAS
  • RURAL AMERICA
  • MARRIED-WOMEN
  • CITIES
  • AGGLOMERATION
  • PRODUCTIVITY
  • EARNINGS
  • BRITAIN
  • WORK

Cite this

Urban Effects on Participation and Wages : Are there Gender Differences? / Phimister, Euan (Corresponding Author).

In: Journal of Urban Economics, Vol. 58, No. 3, 11.2005, p. 513-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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