Use of NeuroEyeCoach™ to Improve Eye Movement Efficacy in Patients with Homonymous Visual Field Loss

Arash Sahraie, Nicola Smania, Josef Zihl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Visual field deficits are common in patients with damaged retinogeniculostriate pathways. The patient’s eye movements are often affected leading to inefficient visual search. Systematic eye movement training also called compensatory therapy is needed to allow patients to develop effective coping strategies. There is a lack of evidence-based, clinical gold-standard registered medical device accessible to patients at home or in clinical settings and NeuroEyeCoach (NEC) is developed to address this need. In three experiments, we report on performance of patients on NEC compared to the data obtained previously on the earlier versions of the search task (); we assessed whether the self-administered computerised tasks can be used to monitor the progress () and compared the findings in a subgroup of patients to a healthy control group. Performance on cancellation tasks, simple visual search, and self-reported responses on activities of daily living was compared, before and after training. Patients performed similarly well on NEC as on previous versions of the therapy; the inbuilt functionality for pre- and postevaluation functions was sensitive to allowing assessment of improvements; and improvements in patients were significantly greater than those in a group of healthy adults. In conclusion, NeuroEyeCoach can be used as an effective rehabilitation tool to develop compensatory strategies in patients with visual field deficits after brain injury.
Original languageEnglish
Article number5186461
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2016

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Eye movements
Eye Movements
Visual Fields
Gold
Patient rehabilitation
Brain
Experiments
Activities of Daily Living
Brain Injuries
Rehabilitation
Equipment and Supplies
Control Groups

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Use of NeuroEyeCoach™ to Improve Eye Movement Efficacy in Patients with Homonymous Visual Field Loss. / Sahraie, Arash; Smania, Nicola; Zihl, Josef.

In: BioMed Research International , Vol. 2016, 5186461, 30.09.2016, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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