Using quantitative methods to understand the assets and burdens of older people to society

the wellbeing implications

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Older people are often considered to be a burden to society, perceived to “live off the state”. However, many older people contribute to their communities in a myriad of ways. In many rural communities older people are a source of help and support to others, volunteering, informally caring for friends and family and can be viewed as assets. Some older people are active in the labour market and many contribute financially by paying a variety of different taxes. This paper reports doctoral research assessing how older people take from and give to society in rural areas. It presents findings from an analysis of secondary data published by the UK Inland Revenue to understand the financial contributions older people make through the payment of income tax. The use of quantitative data to explore the contribution older people make to their communities will then be assessed. The paper concludes by reflecting on the contribution non-representational theory offers as a lens through which the ‘assets’ and ‘burdens' of older people might be elucidated and one through which the hidden geographies of ageing may be uncovered.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationXXVI ESRS On-Line Proceedings
Subtitle of host publicationPlaces of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World
Pages97-98
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventThe XXVI European Society for Rural Sociology Congress - Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Duration: 18 Aug 201521 Aug 2015

Conference

ConferenceThe XXVI European Society for Rural Sociology Congress
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityAberdeen
Period18/08/1521/08/15

Fingerprint

quantitative method
assets
Society
income tax
rural community
community
taxes
revenue
rural area
labor market
geography

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Scotland
  • Quantitaive

Cite this

Maclaren, A. S. (2015). Using quantitative methods to understand the assets and burdens of older people to society: the wellbeing implications. In XXVI ESRS On-Line Proceedings: Places of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World (pp. 97-98) https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.3013.8084

Using quantitative methods to understand the assets and burdens of older people to society : the wellbeing implications. / Maclaren, Andrew Stewart.

XXVI ESRS On-Line Proceedings: Places of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World. 2015. p. 97-98.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Maclaren, AS 2015, Using quantitative methods to understand the assets and burdens of older people to society: the wellbeing implications. in XXVI ESRS On-Line Proceedings: Places of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World. pp. 97-98, The XXVI European Society for Rural Sociology Congress, Aberdeen, United Kingdom, 18/08/15. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.3013.8084
Maclaren AS. Using quantitative methods to understand the assets and burdens of older people to society: the wellbeing implications. In XXVI ESRS On-Line Proceedings: Places of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World. 2015. p. 97-98 https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.3013.8084
Maclaren, Andrew Stewart. / Using quantitative methods to understand the assets and burdens of older people to society : the wellbeing implications. XXVI ESRS On-Line Proceedings: Places of Possibility? Rural Societies in a Neoliberal World. 2015. pp. 97-98
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