Using the demand–control model of job strain to predict caregiver burden and caregiver satisfaction in the informal caregivers of heart failure patients

Gerard J. Molloy, Derek W. Johnston, Marie Johnston, Chuan Gao, Miles D. Witham, Allan D. Struthers, Marion E. T. McMurdo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives:

The demand-control (D-C) model of job strain has generated a considerable body of empirical support in predicting psychological health outcomes in the context of work. This study aimed to extend previous work using the D-C model of job strain to predict caregiver burden and satisfaction in the informal caregivers of patients with heart failure.

Design and method:

Data were gathered from 60 caregiver/patient dyads in a cross-sectional design. Patients with chronic stable heart failure were recruited from out-patient clinics. The dependent variables were caregiver burden and satisfaction. Demand and control were measured using both patient- and caregiver-derived measures.

Results:

The D-C model accounted for 15 and 19% of the variance in caregiver burden, after controlling for age, gender and relationship to the patient. Lower control was associated with higher burden. The D-C model did not predict caregiver satisfaction.

Conclusion:

The D-C model was associated with caregiver burden, but not satisfaction in caregivers, with control being the dominant predictor. Research linking the theory and findings from job strain and informal caregiving studies may elucidate both fields of research.

Using the demand-control model of job strain to predict caregiver burden and caregiver satisfaction in the informal caregivers of heart failure patients.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-417
Number of pages17
JournalBritish Journal of Health Psychology
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

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Caregivers
Heart Failure
Dilatation and Curettage
Research
Outpatients
Psychology

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Caregivers
  • Cost of Illness
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Heart Failure
  • Humans
  • Job Satisfaction
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prospective Studies
  • Workplace

Cite this

Using the demand–control model of job strain to predict caregiver burden and caregiver satisfaction in the informal caregivers of heart failure patients. / Molloy, Gerard J.; Johnston, Derek W.; Johnston, Marie; Gao, Chuan; Witham, Miles D.; Struthers, Allan D.; McMurdo, Marion E. T.

In: British Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 13, No. 3, 09.2008, p. 401-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Molloy, Gerard J. ; Johnston, Derek W. ; Johnston, Marie ; Gao, Chuan ; Witham, Miles D. ; Struthers, Allan D. ; McMurdo, Marion E. T. / Using the demand–control model of job strain to predict caregiver burden and caregiver satisfaction in the informal caregivers of heart failure patients. In: British Journal of Health Psychology. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 401-417.
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abstract = "Objectives: The demand-control (D-C) model of job strain has generated a considerable body of empirical support in predicting psychological health outcomes in the context of work. This study aimed to extend previous work using the D-C model of job strain to predict caregiver burden and satisfaction in the informal caregivers of patients with heart failure. Design and method: Data were gathered from 60 caregiver/patient dyads in a cross-sectional design. Patients with chronic stable heart failure were recruited from out-patient clinics. The dependent variables were caregiver burden and satisfaction. Demand and control were measured using both patient- and caregiver-derived measures. Results: The D-C model accounted for 15 and 19{\%} of the variance in caregiver burden, after controlling for age, gender and relationship to the patient. Lower control was associated with higher burden. The D-C model did not predict caregiver satisfaction. Conclusion: The D-C model was associated with caregiver burden, but not satisfaction in caregivers, with control being the dominant predictor. Research linking the theory and findings from job strain and informal caregiving studies may elucidate both fields of research. Using the demand-control model of job strain to predict caregiver burden and caregiver satisfaction in the informal caregivers of heart failure patients.",
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