Utilising out-of-hours primary care for assistance with cancer pain

A semi-structure interview study of patient and caregiver experiences

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
9 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background Pain is the most frequent complication of cancer and an important reason for out-of-hours (OOH) primary care contacts by patients with established cancer. Existing quantitative data give little insight into the reason for these contacts. Exploring such encounters of care could highlight ways to improve anticipatory cancer care and communication between daytime and OOH primary care services.

Aim To explore the experiences, views, and opinions of patients and their caregivers who have used OOH primary care for help with managing cancer pain.

Design and setting A semi-structured interview study with patients and caregivers who have utilised an OOH primary care service in Grampian, Scotland, because of pain related to cancer.

Method Semi-structured interviews with 11 patients and four caregivers (n = 15), transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis and, to a lesser extent, inductive thematic analysis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e754-e760
Number of pages7
JournalThe British Journal of General Practice
Volume65
Issue number640
Early online date26 Oct 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Primary Health Care
Interviews
Neoplasms
Scotland
Communication
Pain
Cancer Pain

Keywords

  • General Practice
  • Neoplasm
  • Pain

Cite this

@article{b750458905374fe1a468d97846d94ae3,
title = "Utilising out-of-hours primary care for assistance with cancer pain: A semi-structure interview study of patient and caregiver experiences",
abstract = "Background Pain is the most frequent complication of cancer and an important reason for out-of-hours (OOH) primary care contacts by patients with established cancer. Existing quantitative data give little insight into the reason for these contacts. Exploring such encounters of care could highlight ways to improve anticipatory cancer care and communication between daytime and OOH primary care services.Aim To explore the experiences, views, and opinions of patients and their caregivers who have used OOH primary care for help with managing cancer pain.Design and setting A semi-structured interview study with patients and caregivers who have utilised an OOH primary care service in Grampian, Scotland, because of pain related to cancer.Method Semi-structured interviews with 11 patients and four caregivers (n = 15), transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis and, to a lesser extent, inductive thematic analysis.",
keywords = "General Practice, Neoplasm, Pain",
author = "Rosalind Adam and Maria Clausen and Susan Hall and Peter Murchie",
note = "Funding Rosalind Adam completed this work while undertaking a clinical academic fellowship funded by NHS Education for Scotland. No additional funding was received.",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3399/bjgp15X687397",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "e754--e760",
journal = "The British Journal of General Practice",
issn = "0960-1643",
publisher = "Royal College of General Practitioners",
number = "640",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Utilising out-of-hours primary care for assistance with cancer pain

T2 - A semi-structure interview study of patient and caregiver experiences

AU - Adam, Rosalind

AU - Clausen, Maria

AU - Hall, Susan

AU - Murchie, Peter

N1 - Funding Rosalind Adam completed this work while undertaking a clinical academic fellowship funded by NHS Education for Scotland. No additional funding was received.

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - Background Pain is the most frequent complication of cancer and an important reason for out-of-hours (OOH) primary care contacts by patients with established cancer. Existing quantitative data give little insight into the reason for these contacts. Exploring such encounters of care could highlight ways to improve anticipatory cancer care and communication between daytime and OOH primary care services.Aim To explore the experiences, views, and opinions of patients and their caregivers who have used OOH primary care for help with managing cancer pain.Design and setting A semi-structured interview study with patients and caregivers who have utilised an OOH primary care service in Grampian, Scotland, because of pain related to cancer.Method Semi-structured interviews with 11 patients and four caregivers (n = 15), transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis and, to a lesser extent, inductive thematic analysis.

AB - Background Pain is the most frequent complication of cancer and an important reason for out-of-hours (OOH) primary care contacts by patients with established cancer. Existing quantitative data give little insight into the reason for these contacts. Exploring such encounters of care could highlight ways to improve anticipatory cancer care and communication between daytime and OOH primary care services.Aim To explore the experiences, views, and opinions of patients and their caregivers who have used OOH primary care for help with managing cancer pain.Design and setting A semi-structured interview study with patients and caregivers who have utilised an OOH primary care service in Grampian, Scotland, because of pain related to cancer.Method Semi-structured interviews with 11 patients and four caregivers (n = 15), transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis and, to a lesser extent, inductive thematic analysis.

KW - General Practice

KW - Neoplasm

KW - Pain

U2 - 10.3399/bjgp15X687397

DO - 10.3399/bjgp15X687397

M3 - Article

VL - 65

SP - e754-e760

JO - The British Journal of General Practice

JF - The British Journal of General Practice

SN - 0960-1643

IS - 640

ER -