Validation of the Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire

Its sensitivity as a measure of change following treatment and its relationship with other aspects of the pain experience

K Fisher, Marie Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, there has been growing interest in the development of methods for recording disability as an outcome measure to monitor treatment effectiveness in chronic pain patients. Where these methods have relied on self-report, further information is needed about the validity and reliability of the results. Three such studies are reported on the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODQ. These involved comparing actual performance on lifting, sitting and walking tasks with reported limitation on the relevant subsections of the ODQ. The results were able to show encouraging validity and reliability. A factor-analytic study was also undertaken, which determined that there were two distinct factors of disability measured by this instrument. A small cohort of patients were followed up after a pain rehabilitation programme and reductions in disability were found to be reliably measured by the ODQ. The relationships between reported disability and the emotional and cognitive context in which the pain is experienced are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-80
Number of pages14
JournalPhysiotherapy: Theory and Practice
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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Low Back Pain
Reproducibility of Results
Pain
Chronic Pain
Self Report
Walking
Therapeutics
Rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

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