Valuing informal care experience

does choice of measure matter?

Emmanouil Mentzakis, Paul McNamee, Mandy Ryan, Matthew Sutton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Well-being equations are often estimated to generate monetary values for non-marketed activities. In such studies, utility is often approximated by either life satisfaction or General Health Questionnaire scores. We estimate and compare monetary valuations of informal care for the first time in the UK employing both measures, using longitudinal data on well-being and informal care provision. The choice of well-being measure has some effect on the estimated parameters and resulting monetary valuations, but any differences are not statistically significant. Further research is needed to confirm the comparability of these measures if researchers are to continue to use them interchangeably.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-184
Number of pages16
JournalSocial Indicators Research
Volume108
Issue number1
Early online date3 Jun 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2012

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Patient Care
well-being
experience
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questionnaire
health
Well-being
Surveys and Questionnaires
Longitudinal Data
Life Satisfaction
Equations
Questionnaire

Keywords

  • informal care
  • compensating variation
  • subjective well-being
  • life satisfaction
  • GHQ

Cite this

Valuing informal care experience : does choice of measure matter? / Mentzakis, Emmanouil; McNamee, Paul; Ryan, Mandy; Sutton, Matthew.

In: Social Indicators Research, Vol. 108, No. 1, 01.08.2012, p. 169-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mentzakis, Emmanouil ; McNamee, Paul ; Ryan, Mandy ; Sutton, Matthew. / Valuing informal care experience : does choice of measure matter?. In: Social Indicators Research. 2012 ; Vol. 108, No. 1. pp. 169-184.
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