Variable alterations of the microbiota, without metabolic or immunological change, following faecal microbiota transplantation in patients with chronic pouchitis

J Landy, A W Walker, J V Li, H O Al-Hassi, E Ronde, N R English, E R Mann, D Bernardo, S D McLaughlin, J Parkhill, P J Ciclitira, S K Clark, S C Knight, A L Hart

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Abstract

Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is effective in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection, where efficacy correlates with changes in microbiota diversity and composition. The effects of FMT on recipient microbiota in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) remain unclear. We assessed the effects of FMT on microbiota composition and function, mucosal immune response, and clinical outcome in patients with chronic pouchitis. Eight patients with chronic pouchitis (current PDAI ≥7) were treated with FMT via nasogastric administration. Clinical activity was assessed before and four weeks following FMT. Faecal coliform antibiotic sensitivities were analysed, and changes in pouch faecal and mucosal microbiota assessed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Lamina propria dendritic cell phenotype and cytokine profiles were assessed by flow cytometric analysis and multiplex assay. Following FMT, there were variable shifts in faecal and mucosal microbiota composition and, in some patients, changes in proportional abundance of species suggestive of a "healthier" pouch microbiota. However, there were no significant FMT-induced metabolic or immunological changes, or beneficial clinical response. Given the lack of clinical response following FMT via a single nasogastric administration our results suggest that FMT/bacteriotherapy for pouchitis patients requires further optimisation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12955
Number of pages10
JournalScientific Reports
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Aug 2015

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Pouchitis
Microbiota
Clostridium Infections
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation
Mucosal Immunity
Clostridium difficile
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
rRNA Genes
Dendritic Cells
Mucous Membrane
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Cytokines
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Phenotype

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Variable alterations of the microbiota, without metabolic or immunological change, following faecal microbiota transplantation in patients with chronic pouchitis. / Landy, J; Walker, A W; Li, J V; Al-Hassi, H O; Ronde, E; English, N R; Mann, E R; Bernardo, D; McLaughlin, S D; Parkhill, J; Ciclitira, P J; Clark, S K; Knight, S C; Hart, A L.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 5, 12955, 12.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Landy, J, Walker, AW, Li, JV, Al-Hassi, HO, Ronde, E, English, NR, Mann, ER, Bernardo, D, McLaughlin, SD, Parkhill, J, Ciclitira, PJ, Clark, SK, Knight, SC & Hart, AL 2015, 'Variable alterations of the microbiota, without metabolic or immunological change, following faecal microbiota transplantation in patients with chronic pouchitis' Scientific Reports, vol. 5, 12955. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep12955
Landy, J ; Walker, A W ; Li, J V ; Al-Hassi, H O ; Ronde, E ; English, N R ; Mann, E R ; Bernardo, D ; McLaughlin, S D ; Parkhill, J ; Ciclitira, P J ; Clark, S K ; Knight, S C ; Hart, A L. / Variable alterations of the microbiota, without metabolic or immunological change, following faecal microbiota transplantation in patients with chronic pouchitis. In: Scientific Reports. 2015 ; Vol. 5.
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abstract = "Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is effective in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection, where efficacy correlates with changes in microbiota diversity and composition. The effects of FMT on recipient microbiota in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) remain unclear. We assessed the effects of FMT on microbiota composition and function, mucosal immune response, and clinical outcome in patients with chronic pouchitis. Eight patients with chronic pouchitis (current PDAI ≥7) were treated with FMT via nasogastric administration. Clinical activity was assessed before and four weeks following FMT. Faecal coliform antibiotic sensitivities were analysed, and changes in pouch faecal and mucosal microbiota assessed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Lamina propria dendritic cell phenotype and cytokine profiles were assessed by flow cytometric analysis and multiplex assay. Following FMT, there were variable shifts in faecal and mucosal microbiota composition and, in some patients, changes in proportional abundance of species suggestive of a {"}healthier{"} pouch microbiota. However, there were no significant FMT-induced metabolic or immunological changes, or beneficial clinical response. Given the lack of clinical response following FMT via a single nasogastric administration our results suggest that FMT/bacteriotherapy for pouchitis patients requires further optimisation.",
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