VEP Responses to Op-Art Stimuli

Louise O'Hare, Alasdair D F Clarke, Petra M J Pollux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Several types of striped patterns have been reported to cause adverse sensations described as visual discomfort. Previous research using op-art-based stimuli has demonstrated that spurious eye movement signals can cause the experience of illusory motion, or shimmering effects, which might be perceived as uncomfortable. Whilst the shimmering effects are one cause of discomfort, another possible contributor to discomfort is excessive neural responses: As striped patterns do not have the statistical redundancy typical of natural images, they are perhaps unable to be encoded efficiently. If this is the case, then this should be seen in the amplitude of the EEG response. This study found that stimuli that were judged to be most comfortable were also those with the lowest EEG amplitude. This provides some support for the idea that excessive neural responses might also contribute to discomfort judgements in normal populations, in stimuli controlled for perceived contrast.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0139400
Number of pages18
JournalPloS ONE
Volume10
Issue number9
Early online date30 Sep 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2015

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arts
Art
Electroencephalography
eyes
Eye movements
Eye Movements
Redundancy
Research
Population

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O'Hare, L., Clarke, A. D. F., & Pollux, P. M. J. (2015). VEP Responses to Op-Art Stimuli. PloS ONE, 10(9), [e0139400]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0139400

VEP Responses to Op-Art Stimuli. / O'Hare, Louise; Clarke, Alasdair D F; Pollux, Petra M J.

In: PloS ONE, Vol. 10, No. 9, e0139400, 30.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Hare, L, Clarke, ADF & Pollux, PMJ 2015, 'VEP Responses to Op-Art Stimuli', PloS ONE, vol. 10, no. 9, e0139400. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0139400
O'Hare L, Clarke ADF, Pollux PMJ. VEP Responses to Op-Art Stimuli. PloS ONE. 2015 Sep 30;10(9). e0139400. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0139400
O'Hare, Louise ; Clarke, Alasdair D F ; Pollux, Petra M J. / VEP Responses to Op-Art Stimuli. In: PloS ONE. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 9.
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