Views of pharmacists and mentors on experiential learning for pharmacist supplementary prescribing trainees

Johnson George, Jennifer Cleland, Christine M. Bond, Dorothy J. McCaig, I. T. Scott Cunningham, H. Lesley Diack, Derek C. Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To explore the views and experiences of pharmacists and their mentoring designated medical practitioners (DMPs) about the 'period of learning in practice' (PLP) as part of supplementary prescribing (SP) training. Method Two focus groups (n = 5 and 7) of SP pharmacists were organised in Scotland. The experiences and views of DMPs (n = 13) were explored using one-to-one telephone interviews. The focus groups and interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the framework approach. Main outcome measures Views and experiences of pharmacists and DMPs about the PLP. Results Planning the PLP in consultation with the DMP was found to be crucial for an optimal learning experience. Pharmacists who did not have a close working relationship with the medical team had difficulties in identifying a DMP and organising their PLP. Participants stressed the importance of focusing on and achieving the core competencies for prescribers during the PLP. Input from doctors involved in the training of others, review of consultation videos, and formal independent assessment including clinical assessment at the end of the PLP might improve the quality of the PLP. Forums for discussing experiences during the PLP and gathering information might be valuable. Conclusion Our findings have implications for prescribing training for pharmacists in the future. The PLP should focus on core competencies with input from doctors involved in the training of others and have a formal assessment of consultation skills. Support for pharmacists in organising the PLP and forums for discussing experiences during the PLP would be valuable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-271
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacy World and Science
Volume30
Issue number3
Early online date23 Oct 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008

Keywords

  • competency
  • Great Britain
  • medical practitioner
  • period of learning in practice
  • pharmacists
  • Scotland
  • supplementary prescribing

Cite this

Views of pharmacists and mentors on experiential learning for pharmacist supplementary prescribing trainees. / George, Johnson; Cleland, Jennifer; Bond, Christine M.; McCaig, Dorothy J.; Cunningham, I. T. Scott; Diack, H. Lesley; Stewart, Derek C.

In: Pharmacy World and Science, Vol. 30, No. 3, 06.2008, p. 265-271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

George, Johnson ; Cleland, Jennifer ; Bond, Christine M. ; McCaig, Dorothy J. ; Cunningham, I. T. Scott ; Diack, H. Lesley ; Stewart, Derek C. / Views of pharmacists and mentors on experiential learning for pharmacist supplementary prescribing trainees. In: Pharmacy World and Science. 2008 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 265-271.
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