Visions of the great mystery: Grounding the Algonquian manitow concept

Clinton N. Westman, Tara L. Joly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article provides an overview of the Algonquian manitow concept. Manitow is often translated as spirit, god or mythical being, but reflects more complex and culturally grounded ideas about power in animist ontologies. The article suggests that manitow should be translated with care, with attention to a range of meanings. The authors refer primarily to Cree examples from Alberta, Canada, but also take a broader view to consider examples from other Algonquian contexts. Beginning with a discussion of definitions, the article then turns to the concept’s theoretical career. The article provides data on the contemporary dynamics of the manitow in the context of Cree religious pluralism, as well as on the emplacement of manitow relations through toponymy, particularly as seen around lakes named manitow sâkahikan.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-375
Number of pages16
JournalSocial Compass
Volume64
Issue number3
Early online date24 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017

Fingerprint

pluralism
ontology
god
career
Canada
Grounding
Cree
Mystery
Alberta
Religious Pluralism
Toponymy
Ontology
Deity

Keywords

  • Algonquian
  • Cree
  • indigenous
  • manitow
  • North America
  • religious language

Cite this

Visions of the great mystery : Grounding the Algonquian manitow concept. / Westman, Clinton N.; Joly, Tara L.

In: Social Compass, Vol. 64, No. 3, 01.09.2017, p. 360-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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