Voices of the Land, Samizdat, and Visionary Politics

On the Social Life of Altai Narratives

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article analyses the social life of narratives within the contemporary Ak-Jang [Ak-Çaŋ] movement of the Altai people of Southern Siberia, based on periodic fieldwork from 2009-2012, with recent updates using the Internet and short trips. The author argues that the Ak-Jang movement, while it has roots and commonalities in the Burkhanist “new religion” of the turn of the twentieth century, also has divergences. While both were politically oppositionist, Ak-Jang members today mobilize against formal, official Buddhism and against outsiders, including tourists. Focus of the article is on written texts, often defending the ecology of sacred lands, stemming from cosmic “messages” received by Ak-Jang members.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38–81
Number of pages44
JournalAnthropology & Archeology of Eurasia
Volume57
Issue number1-2
Early online date17 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

narrative
Buddhism
politics
Siberia
divergence
ecology
tourist
twentieth century
Religion
Internet
Altai
Samizdat
Social Life
Ecology
Tourists
Divergence
Trip
Outsider
New Religions
World Wide Web

Keywords

  • Altai
  • Southern Siberia
  • Ak-Jang [Ak-Çaŋ]
  • ecology
  • new religious movement
  • visionaries

Cite this

Voices of the Land, Samizdat, and Visionary Politics : On the Social Life of Altai Narratives. / Arzyutov, Dmitry.

In: Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia , Vol. 57, No. 1-2, 2018, p. 38–81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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