What have birth cohort studies asked about genetic, pre- and perinatal exposures and child and adolescent onset mental health outcomes?

A systematic review

Lucy Thompson, Jeremy Kemp, Philip Wilson, Rachel Pritchett, Helen Minnis, Louise Toms-Whittle, Christine Puckering, James Law, Christopher Gillberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Increased understanding of early neurobehavioural development is needed to prevent, identify, and treat childhood psychopathology most effectively at the earliest possible stage. Prospective birth cohorts can elucidate the association of genes, environment, and their interactions with neurobehavioural development. We conducted a systematic review of the birth cohort literature. On the basis of internet searches and 6,248 peer-reviewed references, 105 longitudinal epidemiological studies were identified. Twenty studies met inclusion criteria (prospectively recruited, population-based cohort studies, including at least one assessment before the end of the perinatal period and at least one assessment of behaviour, temperament/personality, neuropsychiatric or psychiatric status before 19 years of age), and their methodologies were reviewed in full. Whilst the birth cohort studies did examine some aspects of behaviour and neurodevelopment, observations in the early months and years were rare. Furthermore, aspects of sampling method, sample size, data collection, design, and breadth and depth of measurement in some studies made research questions about neurodevelopment difficult to answer. Existing birth cohort studies have yielded limited information on how pre- and perinatal factors and early neurodevelopment relate to child psychopathology. Further epidemiological research is required with a specific focus on early neurodevelopment. Studies are needed which include the measures of early childhood psychopathology and involve long-term follow-up.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume19
Issue number1
Early online date28 Jul 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010

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Mental Health
Cohort Studies
Psychopathology
Parturition
Gene-Environment Interaction
Temperament
Research
Internet
Sample Size
Psychiatry
Longitudinal Studies
Personality
Epidemiologic Studies
Population

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • adult
  • age of onset
  • autistic disorder
  • child
  • child development
  • child, preschool
  • cohort studies
  • conduct disorder
  • environmental exposure
  • female
  • genetic predisposition to disease
  • humans
  • infant
  • infant, newborn
  • internationality
  • longitudinal studies
  • male
  • mental disorders
  • pregnancy
  • prenatal exposure delayed effects
  • prospective studies
  • risk factors
  • young adult

Cite this

What have birth cohort studies asked about genetic, pre- and perinatal exposures and child and adolescent onset mental health outcomes? A systematic review. / Thompson, Lucy; Kemp, Jeremy; Wilson, Philip; Pritchett, Rachel; Minnis, Helen; Toms-Whittle, Louise; Puckering, Christine; Law, James; Gillberg, Christopher.

In: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thompson, Lucy ; Kemp, Jeremy ; Wilson, Philip ; Pritchett, Rachel ; Minnis, Helen ; Toms-Whittle, Louise ; Puckering, Christine ; Law, James ; Gillberg, Christopher. / What have birth cohort studies asked about genetic, pre- and perinatal exposures and child and adolescent onset mental health outcomes? A systematic review. In: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 2010 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 1-15.
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