What the Body Remembers: Theological Reflections on Dementia

John Swinton*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The article explores the experience of spirituality and advanced dementia from the perspective of Christian theology. It examines the significance of Christian education and spiritual practices for understanding the significance of spirituality for people living with advanced dementia. The article explores the nature of memory and the importance of the body in remembering. When our recall memory fades, our bodily memory remains. The real question is whether people can recognise the importance of body memory and enable deeper understanding through such recognition. The article indicates ways in which bodily memory can be reclaimed as significant for dementia care and what that might look like.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)160-172
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging
Volume26
Issue number2-3
Early online date17 Apr 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

dementia
spirituality
theology
Theological Reflection
Dementia
education
experience
Spirituality

Keywords

  • aging and spirituality
  • bodily memory
  • church
  • dementia
  • memory
  • ministry
  • spiritual experiences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Religious studies

Cite this

What the Body Remembers : Theological Reflections on Dementia. / Swinton, John.

In: Journal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging, Vol. 26, No. 2-3, 2014, p. 160-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{fd0f963203524713bb29c8095ba6de2d,
title = "What the Body Remembers: Theological Reflections on Dementia",
abstract = "The article explores the experience of spirituality and advanced dementia from the perspective of Christian theology. It examines the significance of Christian education and spiritual practices for understanding the significance of spirituality for people living with advanced dementia. The article explores the nature of memory and the importance of the body in remembering. When our recall memory fades, our bodily memory remains. The real question is whether people can recognise the importance of body memory and enable deeper understanding through such recognition. The article indicates ways in which bodily memory can be reclaimed as significant for dementia care and what that might look like.",
keywords = "aging and spirituality, bodily memory, church, dementia, memory, ministry, spiritual experiences",
author = "John Swinton",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/15528030.2013.855966",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "160--172",
journal = "Journal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging",
issn = "1552-8030",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2-3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - What the Body Remembers

T2 - Theological Reflections on Dementia

AU - Swinton, John

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - The article explores the experience of spirituality and advanced dementia from the perspective of Christian theology. It examines the significance of Christian education and spiritual practices for understanding the significance of spirituality for people living with advanced dementia. The article explores the nature of memory and the importance of the body in remembering. When our recall memory fades, our bodily memory remains. The real question is whether people can recognise the importance of body memory and enable deeper understanding through such recognition. The article indicates ways in which bodily memory can be reclaimed as significant for dementia care and what that might look like.

AB - The article explores the experience of spirituality and advanced dementia from the perspective of Christian theology. It examines the significance of Christian education and spiritual practices for understanding the significance of spirituality for people living with advanced dementia. The article explores the nature of memory and the importance of the body in remembering. When our recall memory fades, our bodily memory remains. The real question is whether people can recognise the importance of body memory and enable deeper understanding through such recognition. The article indicates ways in which bodily memory can be reclaimed as significant for dementia care and what that might look like.

KW - aging and spirituality

KW - bodily memory

KW - church

KW - dementia

KW - memory

KW - ministry

KW - spiritual experiences

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899650235&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15528030.2013.855966

DO - 10.1080/15528030.2013.855966

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84899650235

VL - 26

SP - 160

EP - 172

JO - Journal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging

JF - Journal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging

SN - 1552-8030

IS - 2-3

ER -