What the disinterested perceiver overlooks: Goal-directed social categorization

L F Pendry, Neil Macrae

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research has suggested that initial categorization of a target is a rapid, automatic process that occurs relatively independently of attentional and motivational factors. Further processing requires both perceiver interest in the target and sufficient attentional resources. The present study investigated the effects of information-processing goals on the categorization process. With one of three information-processing goals in place-accountability to a third party, estimation of the target's height of inspection of the videotape clarity-subjects watched a videotape of a businesswoman. Target categorization was measured using a lexical decision task. The results demonstrated that whereas subjects in all conditions categorized the target at a superordinate level (i.e., woman), accountable subjects also categorized the target at a more differentiated subtype level (i.e., businesswoman). The authors consider these findings in the context of contemporary model of stereotyping and impression formation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-256
Number of pages8
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume22
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1996

Keywords

  • INFORMATION-PROCESSING STRATEGIES
  • INDIVIDUATING PROCESSES
  • IMPRESSION-FORMATION
  • OUTCOME DEPENDENCY
  • SEX STEREOTYPES
  • ATTENTION
  • MEMORY
  • ACCOUNTABILITY
  • COMPLEXITY
  • PROTOTYPES

Cite this

What the disinterested perceiver overlooks: Goal-directed social categorization. / Pendry, L F ; Macrae, Neil.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 22, No. 3, 03.1996, p. 249-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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