What We Mean When We Talk About Adherence In Respiratory Medicine

Bernard Vrijens, Alexandra L. Dima, Eric Van Ganse, Job F. M. van Boven, Michelle N. Eakin, Juliet M. Foster, Marijn de Bruin, Alison Chisholm, David Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Adequate medication adherence is key for optimal benefit of pharmacological treatments. A wealth of research has been conducted to understand and identify opportunities to intervene to improve medication adherence, but variations in adherence definitions within prior research have led to ambiguity in study findings. The lack of a standard taxonomy hinders the development of cumulative science in adherence research. This article reviews the newly established Ascertaining Barriers to Compliance (ABC) taxonomy for medication adherence with a particular focus on its relevance and applicability within the context of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management. Building on traditional definitions and concepts within medication adherence, the ABC taxonomy considers the temporal sequence of steps a patient must undertake to be defined as “adherent to treatment”: (A) initiation, (B) implementation, and (C) persistence. We explain the clinical and research relevance of differentiating between these phases, point to differences in its applicability in observational and experimental research, review strengths and limitations of available measures, and highlight recent findings on specific determinants of these behaviors. Finally, we provide recommendations for research and practice with a view to supporting and sign posting opportunities to improve future respiratory medication adherence and associated research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)802-812
Number of pages11
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume4
Issue number5
Early online date30 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2016

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Medicine
Medication Adherence
Research
Compliance
Disease Management
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Asthma
Pharmacology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • medication adherence
  • asthma
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • initiation
  • implementation
  • persistence
  • ABC taxonomy

Cite this

What We Mean When We Talk About Adherence In Respiratory Medicine. / Vrijens, Bernard ; Dima, Alexandra L. ; Van Ganse, Eric; van Boven, Job F. M.; Eakin, Michelle N.; Foster, Juliet M.; de Bruin, Marijn; Chisholm, Alison; Price, David.

In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Vol. 4, No. 5, 09.2016, p. 802-812.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vrijens, B, Dima, AL, Van Ganse, E, van Boven, JFM, Eakin, MN, Foster, JM, de Bruin, M, Chisholm, A & Price, D 2016, 'What We Mean When We Talk About Adherence In Respiratory Medicine', The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, vol. 4, no. 5, pp. 802-812. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2016.05.019
Vrijens, Bernard ; Dima, Alexandra L. ; Van Ganse, Eric ; van Boven, Job F. M. ; Eakin, Michelle N. ; Foster, Juliet M. ; de Bruin, Marijn ; Chisholm, Alison ; Price, David. / What We Mean When We Talk About Adherence In Respiratory Medicine. In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. 2016 ; Vol. 4, No. 5. pp. 802-812.
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