Where to settle in a rapidly expanding bird colony

A case study on colony expansion in High Arctic breeding geese

Helen B. Anderson*, Jesper Madsen, Sarah J. Woodin, Rene Van Der Wal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

As colonies fill up with more individuals, areas of preferred nesting habitat can become scarce. Individuals attracted to the colony by the presence of conspecifics may then occupy nest sites with different habitat characteristics to that of established breeders and, as a result, experience lower nesting success. We studied a rapidly growing colony of Svalbard pink-footed geese Anser brachyrhynchus to determine any such changes in nest site characteristics and nesting success of newly used nest locations. Svalbard pink-footed geese are a long-livedmigratory species that breeds during the short Arctic summer and whose population has doubled since the early 2000s to c. 80,000. From 2003 to 2012, nest numbers increased over fivefold, from 49 to 226, with the majority (range 57-82 %) established within 30m of another nest (total range 1-164 m). Most nests, particularly during the early stages of colony growth, shared common features associated with better protection against predation and closer proximity to food resources; two factors thought key in the evolution of colony formation. As nest numbers within the colony increased, new nests occupied locations where visibility from the nest was restricted and foraging areas were further away. Despite these changes in nest site characteristics, the nesting success of geese using new sites was not lower than that of birds using older nests. Hence, we propose that nesting in dense aggregations may offset any effects of suboptimal nest site characteristics on nesting success via the presence ofmore adults and the resultant increased vigilance towards predators.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)325-334
Number of pages10
JournalBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Volume69
Issue number2
Early online date14 Nov 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2015

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geese
Arctic region
nest
breeding
nests
case studies
bird
nesting success
birds
nest site
nesting sites
Anser
vigilance
habitat
habitats
visibility
fill
predation
foraging
predator

Keywords

  • Nest site characteristics
  • Nesting success
  • Clustering
  • Coloniality
  • Geese

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Where to settle in a rapidly expanding bird colony : A case study on colony expansion in High Arctic breeding geese. / Anderson, Helen B.; Madsen, Jesper; Woodin, Sarah J.; Van Der Wal, Rene.

In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, Vol. 69, No. 2, 02.2015, p. 325-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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