Who has two jobs and why? Evidence from rural coastal communities in west Scotland

Heather Suzanne Dickey, Ioannis Theodossiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the incidence of and reasons for multiple-job holding in the context of rural communities where multiple-job holding is viewed as an important means of promoting community sustainability. Drawing upon a unique data set of a relatively homogeneous population living in an isolated area on the west coast of Scotland, where employment opportunities are limited, dual-job holding is investigated within the fisheries and aquaculture occupations. Evidence is found that the hours constraints motive for multiple-job holding better explains multiple-job-holding behavior among employed rural workers in aquaculture than among self-employed fishermen, and that educational attainment has a positive impact on the incidence of multiple-job holding.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-301
Number of pages10
JournalAgricultural Economics
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

Keywords

  • multiple-job holding
  • sustainability of rural communities
  • OFF-FARM LABOR
  • INCOME
  • WORK
  • ECONOMICS
  • DYNAMICS
  • MOBILITY
  • MARKETS

Cite this

Who has two jobs and why? Evidence from rural coastal communities in west Scotland. / Dickey, Heather Suzanne; Theodossiou, Ioannis.

In: Agricultural Economics, Vol. 34, No. 3, 05.2006, p. 291-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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