Why does work cause fatigue? A real-time investigation of fatigue, and determinants of fatigue in nurses working 12 hour shifts

Derek W. Johnston (Corresponding Author), Julia L. Allan, Daniel J. H. Powell, Martyn C. Jones, Barbara Farquharson, Cheryl Bell, Marie Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background
One of the striking regularities of human behavior is that a prolonged physical, cognitive, or emotional activity leads to feelings of fatigue. Fatigue could be due to (1) depletion of a finite resource of physical and/or psychological energy or (2) changes in motivation, attention, and goal-directed effort (e.g. motivational control theory).

Purpose
To contrast predictions from these two views in a real-time study of subjective fatigue in nurses while working.

Methods
One hundred nurses provided 1,453 assessments over two 12-hr shifts. Nurses rated fatigue, demand, control, and reward every 90 min. Physical energy expenditure was measured objectively using Actiheart. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel models to predict fatigue from (a) the accumulated values of physical energy expended, demand, control, and reward over the shift and (b) from distributed lag models of the same variables over the previous 90 min.

Results
Virtually all participants showed increasing fatigue over the work period. This increase was slightly greater when working overnight. Fatigue was not dependent on physical energy expended nor perceived work demands. However, it was related to perceived control over work and perceived reward associated with work.

Conclusions
Findings provide little support for a resource depletion model; however, the finding that control and reward both predicted fatigue is consistent with a motivational account of fatigue.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)551-562
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume53
Issue number6
Early online date16 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Fatigue
Nurses
Reward
Time and Motion Studies
Energy Metabolism
Motivation
Emotions
Psychology

Keywords

  • control
  • Ecological momentary assessment
  • fatigue
  • motivation
  • reward
  • resource depletion
  • Control
  • Motivation
  • Fatigue
  • Reward
  • Resource depletion
  • WORKFORCE
  • NURSING TASKS
  • SELF-CONTROL
  • PERFORMANCE
  • MODEL
  • PREVALENCE
  • RECOVERY
  • EGO-DEPLETION
  • STRESS
  • MENTAL FATIGUE

Cite this

@article{a515e00b3ec24a07bf69fc7b88bd0eaa,
title = "Why does work cause fatigue? A real-time investigation of fatigue, and determinants of fatigue in nurses working 12 hour shifts",
abstract = "BackgroundOne of the striking regularities of human behavior is that a prolonged physical, cognitive, or emotional activity leads to feelings of fatigue. Fatigue could be due to (1) depletion of a finite resource of physical and/or psychological energy or (2) changes in motivation, attention, and goal-directed effort (e.g. motivational control theory).PurposeTo contrast predictions from these two views in a real-time study of subjective fatigue in nurses while working.MethodsOne hundred nurses provided 1,453 assessments over two 12-hr shifts. Nurses rated fatigue, demand, control, and reward every 90 min. Physical energy expenditure was measured objectively using Actiheart. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel models to predict fatigue from (a) the accumulated values of physical energy expended, demand, control, and reward over the shift and (b) from distributed lag models of the same variables over the previous 90 min.ResultsVirtually all participants showed increasing fatigue over the work period. This increase was slightly greater when working overnight. Fatigue was not dependent on physical energy expended nor perceived work demands. However, it was related to perceived control over work and perceived reward associated with work.ConclusionsFindings provide little support for a resource depletion model; however, the finding that control and reward both predicted fatigue is consistent with a motivational account of fatigue.",
keywords = "control, Ecological momentary assessment, fatigue, motivation, reward, resource depletion, Control, Motivation, Fatigue, Reward, Resource depletion, WORKFORCE, NURSING TASKS, SELF-CONTROL, PERFORMANCE, MODEL, PREVALENCE, RECOVERY, EGO-DEPLETION, STRESS, MENTAL FATIGUE",
author = "Johnston, {Derek W.} and Allan, {Julia L.} and Powell, {Daniel J. H.} and Jones, {Martyn C.} and Barbara Farquharson and Cheryl Bell and Marie Johnston",
note = "This research was supported by the Chief Scientists Office of the Scottish Government, Principal Investigator Marie Johnston, and Grant Number CZH/4/640. We wish to thank Fiona Steele and David Hendry for very valuable statistical advice.",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1093/abm/kay065",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "551--562",
journal = "Annals of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "0883-6612",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "6",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Why does work cause fatigue? A real-time investigation of fatigue, and determinants of fatigue in nurses working 12 hour shifts

AU - Johnston, Derek W.

AU - Allan, Julia L.

AU - Powell, Daniel J. H.

AU - Jones, Martyn C.

AU - Farquharson, Barbara

AU - Bell, Cheryl

AU - Johnston, Marie

N1 - This research was supported by the Chief Scientists Office of the Scottish Government, Principal Investigator Marie Johnston, and Grant Number CZH/4/640. We wish to thank Fiona Steele and David Hendry for very valuable statistical advice.

PY - 2019/6

Y1 - 2019/6

N2 - BackgroundOne of the striking regularities of human behavior is that a prolonged physical, cognitive, or emotional activity leads to feelings of fatigue. Fatigue could be due to (1) depletion of a finite resource of physical and/or psychological energy or (2) changes in motivation, attention, and goal-directed effort (e.g. motivational control theory).PurposeTo contrast predictions from these two views in a real-time study of subjective fatigue in nurses while working.MethodsOne hundred nurses provided 1,453 assessments over two 12-hr shifts. Nurses rated fatigue, demand, control, and reward every 90 min. Physical energy expenditure was measured objectively using Actiheart. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel models to predict fatigue from (a) the accumulated values of physical energy expended, demand, control, and reward over the shift and (b) from distributed lag models of the same variables over the previous 90 min.ResultsVirtually all participants showed increasing fatigue over the work period. This increase was slightly greater when working overnight. Fatigue was not dependent on physical energy expended nor perceived work demands. However, it was related to perceived control over work and perceived reward associated with work.ConclusionsFindings provide little support for a resource depletion model; however, the finding that control and reward both predicted fatigue is consistent with a motivational account of fatigue.

AB - BackgroundOne of the striking regularities of human behavior is that a prolonged physical, cognitive, or emotional activity leads to feelings of fatigue. Fatigue could be due to (1) depletion of a finite resource of physical and/or psychological energy or (2) changes in motivation, attention, and goal-directed effort (e.g. motivational control theory).PurposeTo contrast predictions from these two views in a real-time study of subjective fatigue in nurses while working.MethodsOne hundred nurses provided 1,453 assessments over two 12-hr shifts. Nurses rated fatigue, demand, control, and reward every 90 min. Physical energy expenditure was measured objectively using Actiheart. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel models to predict fatigue from (a) the accumulated values of physical energy expended, demand, control, and reward over the shift and (b) from distributed lag models of the same variables over the previous 90 min.ResultsVirtually all participants showed increasing fatigue over the work period. This increase was slightly greater when working overnight. Fatigue was not dependent on physical energy expended nor perceived work demands. However, it was related to perceived control over work and perceived reward associated with work.ConclusionsFindings provide little support for a resource depletion model; however, the finding that control and reward both predicted fatigue is consistent with a motivational account of fatigue.

KW - control

KW - Ecological momentary assessment

KW - fatigue

KW - motivation

KW - reward

KW - resource depletion

KW - Control

KW - Motivation

KW - Fatigue

KW - Reward

KW - Resource depletion

KW - WORKFORCE

KW - NURSING TASKS

KW - SELF-CONTROL

KW - PERFORMANCE

KW - MODEL

KW - PREVALENCE

KW - RECOVERY

KW - EGO-DEPLETION

KW - STRESS

KW - MENTAL FATIGUE

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/work-cause-fatigue-realtime-investigation-fatigue-determinants-fatigue-nurses-working-12hour-shifts

U2 - 10.1093/abm/kay065

DO - 10.1093/abm/kay065

M3 - Article

VL - 53

SP - 551

EP - 562

JO - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

JF - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 0883-6612

IS - 6

ER -