Why has research in face recognition progressed so slowly?

The importance of variability

A. Mike Burton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Despite many years of research, there has been surprisingly little progress in our understanding of how faces are identified. Here I argue that there are two contributory factors: (a) Our methods have obscured a critical aspect of the problem, within-person variability; and (b) research has tended to conflate familiar and unfamiliar face processing. Examples of procedures for studying variability are given, and a case is made for studying real faces, of the type people recognize every day. I argue that face recognition (specifically identification) may only be understood by adopting new techniques that acknowledge statistical patterns in the visual environment. As a consequence, some of our current methods will need to be abandoned.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1467-1485
Number of pages19
JournalQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume66
Issue number8
Early online date7 Jun 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2013

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Facial Recognition

Keywords

  • face recognition
  • identity
  • variability

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Why has research in face recognition progressed so slowly? The importance of variability. / Burton, A. Mike.

In: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, Vol. 66, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 1467-1485.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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