Work factors related to psychological and health-related distress among employees with chronic illnesses

F. Munir, J. Yarker, C. Haslam, H. Long, S. Leka, A. Griffiths, Sara Jane Cox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examined specific psychosocial factors associated with psychological and health-related distress amongst employees reporting different chronic illnesses. Methods: The sample consisted of 1029 employees managing either musculoskeletal pain (n=324), arthritis and rheumatism (n=192), asthma (n=174), depression and anxiety (n=152), heart disease (n=96) or diabetes (n=91). Information on psychological distress, work limitations, illness management, disclosure, absence, presenteeism, support and demographic factors were obtained through self-administered questionnaires. Results: Both low psychological well-being and high health-related distress were associated with an increase in work limitations (β=0.20, SE=.03; and β=0.19, SE=.01, respectively), poorer management of illness symptoms at work (β=-0.17, SE=.12; and β=-0.13, SE=.02), high presentieesm (β=0.19, SE=.25; and β=0.14, SE=.05) and low workplace support (β=-0.05, SE=.22; and β=-0.12, SE=.05). Health-related distress was additionally associated with disclosure of illness at work (β=0.18, SE=.08) and long-term sickness absence (β=0.10, SE=.06). Conclusions: To enable individuals to effectively manage both their illness and their work without serious repercussions, it is important for both healthcare professionals and employers alike, to improve the well-being of workers with chronic illness by supporting and facilitating their efforts to over-come health-related limitations at work. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-277
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Chronic Disease
Psychology
Health
Disclosure
Musculoskeletal Pain
Rheumatic Diseases
Workplace
Arthritis
Heart Diseases
Asthma
Anxiety
Demography
Depression
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • absenteeism
  • adult
  • anxiety
  • arthritis
  • article
  • asthma
  • chronic disease
  • controlled study
  • depression
  • diabetes mellitus
  • distress syndrome
  • female
  • heart disease
  • human
  • job stress
  • major clinical study
  • male
  • mental stress
  • musculoskeletal pain
  • questionnaire
  • rheumatic disease
  • social psychology
  • wellbeing
  • work capacity
  • workplace, Adult
  • Chronic Disease
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Self Care
  • Sick Leave
  • Social Adjustment
  • Stress, Psychological
  • Work
  • Workplace

Cite this

Work factors related to psychological and health-related distress among employees with chronic illnesses. / Munir, F.; Yarker, J.; Haslam, C.; Long, H.; Leka, S.; Griffiths, A.; Cox, Sara Jane.

In: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, Vol. 17, No. 2, 2007, p. 259-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Munir, F. ; Yarker, J. ; Haslam, C. ; Long, H. ; Leka, S. ; Griffiths, A. ; Cox, Sara Jane. / Work factors related to psychological and health-related distress among employees with chronic illnesses. In: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation. 2007 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 259-277.
@article{da4590ef2a2c4804bccd5d41334969f7,
title = "Work factors related to psychological and health-related distress among employees with chronic illnesses",
abstract = "Objective: This study examined specific psychosocial factors associated with psychological and health-related distress amongst employees reporting different chronic illnesses. Methods: The sample consisted of 1029 employees managing either musculoskeletal pain (n=324), arthritis and rheumatism (n=192), asthma (n=174), depression and anxiety (n=152), heart disease (n=96) or diabetes (n=91). Information on psychological distress, work limitations, illness management, disclosure, absence, presenteeism, support and demographic factors were obtained through self-administered questionnaires. Results: Both low psychological well-being and high health-related distress were associated with an increase in work limitations (β=0.20, SE=.03; and β=0.19, SE=.01, respectively), poorer management of illness symptoms at work (β=-0.17, SE=.12; and β=-0.13, SE=.02), high presentieesm (β=0.19, SE=.25; and β=0.14, SE=.05) and low workplace support (β=-0.05, SE=.22; and β=-0.12, SE=.05). Health-related distress was additionally associated with disclosure of illness at work (β=0.18, SE=.08) and long-term sickness absence (β=0.10, SE=.06). Conclusions: To enable individuals to effectively manage both their illness and their work without serious repercussions, it is important for both healthcare professionals and employers alike, to improve the well-being of workers with chronic illness by supporting and facilitating their efforts to over-come health-related limitations at work. {\circledC} 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.",
keywords = "absenteeism, adult, anxiety, arthritis, article, asthma, chronic disease, controlled study, depression, diabetes mellitus, distress syndrome, female, heart disease, human, job stress, major clinical study, male, mental stress, musculoskeletal pain, questionnaire, rheumatic disease, social psychology, wellbeing, work capacity, workplace, Adult, Chronic Disease, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Health Surveys, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Self Care, Sick Leave, Social Adjustment, Stress, Psychological, Work, Workplace",
author = "F. Munir and J. Yarker and C. Haslam and H. Long and S. Leka and A. Griffiths and Cox, {Sara Jane}",
note = "cited By 54",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1007/s10926-007-9074-3",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "259--277",
journal = "Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Work factors related to psychological and health-related distress among employees with chronic illnesses

AU - Munir, F.

AU - Yarker, J.

AU - Haslam, C.

AU - Long, H.

AU - Leka, S.

AU - Griffiths, A.

AU - Cox, Sara Jane

N1 - cited By 54

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Objective: This study examined specific psychosocial factors associated with psychological and health-related distress amongst employees reporting different chronic illnesses. Methods: The sample consisted of 1029 employees managing either musculoskeletal pain (n=324), arthritis and rheumatism (n=192), asthma (n=174), depression and anxiety (n=152), heart disease (n=96) or diabetes (n=91). Information on psychological distress, work limitations, illness management, disclosure, absence, presenteeism, support and demographic factors were obtained through self-administered questionnaires. Results: Both low psychological well-being and high health-related distress were associated with an increase in work limitations (β=0.20, SE=.03; and β=0.19, SE=.01, respectively), poorer management of illness symptoms at work (β=-0.17, SE=.12; and β=-0.13, SE=.02), high presentieesm (β=0.19, SE=.25; and β=0.14, SE=.05) and low workplace support (β=-0.05, SE=.22; and β=-0.12, SE=.05). Health-related distress was additionally associated with disclosure of illness at work (β=0.18, SE=.08) and long-term sickness absence (β=0.10, SE=.06). Conclusions: To enable individuals to effectively manage both their illness and their work without serious repercussions, it is important for both healthcare professionals and employers alike, to improve the well-being of workers with chronic illness by supporting and facilitating their efforts to over-come health-related limitations at work. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

AB - Objective: This study examined specific psychosocial factors associated with psychological and health-related distress amongst employees reporting different chronic illnesses. Methods: The sample consisted of 1029 employees managing either musculoskeletal pain (n=324), arthritis and rheumatism (n=192), asthma (n=174), depression and anxiety (n=152), heart disease (n=96) or diabetes (n=91). Information on psychological distress, work limitations, illness management, disclosure, absence, presenteeism, support and demographic factors were obtained through self-administered questionnaires. Results: Both low psychological well-being and high health-related distress were associated with an increase in work limitations (β=0.20, SE=.03; and β=0.19, SE=.01, respectively), poorer management of illness symptoms at work (β=-0.17, SE=.12; and β=-0.13, SE=.02), high presentieesm (β=0.19, SE=.25; and β=0.14, SE=.05) and low workplace support (β=-0.05, SE=.22; and β=-0.12, SE=.05). Health-related distress was additionally associated with disclosure of illness at work (β=0.18, SE=.08) and long-term sickness absence (β=0.10, SE=.06). Conclusions: To enable individuals to effectively manage both their illness and their work without serious repercussions, it is important for both healthcare professionals and employers alike, to improve the well-being of workers with chronic illness by supporting and facilitating their efforts to over-come health-related limitations at work. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

KW - absenteeism

KW - adult

KW - anxiety

KW - arthritis

KW - article

KW - asthma

KW - chronic disease

KW - controlled study

KW - depression

KW - diabetes mellitus

KW - distress syndrome

KW - female

KW - heart disease

KW - human

KW - job stress

KW - major clinical study

KW - male

KW - mental stress

KW - musculoskeletal pain

KW - questionnaire

KW - rheumatic disease

KW - social psychology

KW - wellbeing

KW - work capacity

KW - workplace, Adult

KW - Chronic Disease

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Female

KW - Health Surveys

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Self Care

KW - Sick Leave

KW - Social Adjustment

KW - Stress, Psychological

KW - Work

KW - Workplace

U2 - 10.1007/s10926-007-9074-3

DO - 10.1007/s10926-007-9074-3

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 259

EP - 277

JO - Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation

IS - 2

ER -