Worker absenteeism

a study of contagion effects

Tim Barmby, Makram Larguem

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Abstract

A number of recent studies have suggested that workers’ attendance as well as their absence, could have importance for the way in which firms’ design remuneration contracts, see Chatterji and Tilley (2000) and Skåtun (2002). One aspect of this is that, since worker absenteeism is in large part due to illness, if contracts impose costs on workers which induce them to attend work when ill this could result in the illness being more readily communicated to other workers with associated effects on productivity. This paper seeks to quantify such contagion effects by examining a personnel dataset which allows us to track daily absence decisions of a group of industrial workers employed in the same factory
Original languageEnglish
PublisherCentre for European Labour Market Research
Number of pages9
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2004

Publication series

NameUniversity of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series
No.01
Volume2004
ISSN (Print)0143-4543

Fingerprint

Absenteeism
Contagion effect
Workers
Illness
Remuneration
Factory
Attendance
Costs
Productivity
Personnel

Cite this

Barmby, T., & Larguem, M. (2004). Worker absenteeism: a study of contagion effects. (University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series; Vol. 2004, No. 01). Centre for European Labour Market Research.

Worker absenteeism : a study of contagion effects. / Barmby, Tim; Larguem, Makram.

Centre for European Labour Market Research, 2004. (University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series; Vol. 2004, No. 01).

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Barmby, T & Larguem, M 2004 'Worker absenteeism: a study of contagion effects' University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series, no. 01, vol. 2004, Centre for European Labour Market Research.
Barmby T, Larguem M. Worker absenteeism: a study of contagion effects. Centre for European Labour Market Research. 2004 Feb. (University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series; 01).
Barmby, Tim ; Larguem, Makram. / Worker absenteeism : a study of contagion effects. Centre for European Labour Market Research, 2004. (University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series; 01).
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