Your job or your life?

The uncertain relationship of unemployment and mortality

Keith A. Bender, Ioannis Theodossiou

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Abstract

Contrary to the epidemiological literature, some studies find that increases in unemployment decrease mortality. Using US state level data on unemployment, mortality and other covariates for 1974 to 2003, this paper revisits this issue by, first, allowing for transitory and permanent effects of unemployment and, second, by allowing for cross-panel correlations. The results show that most mortality measures increase with contemporaneous unemployment and indicate that increases in long-run unemployment increase mortality.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherCentre for European Labour Market Research
Number of pages33
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

Publication series

NameUniversity of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series
No.22
Volume2007
ISSN (Print)0143-4543

Fingerprint

Unemployment
Mortality
Covariates
U.S. States

Cite this

Bender, K. A., & Theodossiou, I. (2007). Your job or your life? The uncertain relationship of unemployment and mortality. (University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series; Vol. 2007, No. 22). Centre for European Labour Market Research.

Your job or your life? The uncertain relationship of unemployment and mortality. / Bender, Keith A.; Theodossiou, Ioannis.

Centre for European Labour Market Research, 2007. (University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series; Vol. 2007, No. 22).

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Bender, KA & Theodossiou, I 2007 'Your job or your life? The uncertain relationship of unemployment and mortality' University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series, no. 22, vol. 2007, Centre for European Labour Market Research.
Bender KA, Theodossiou I. Your job or your life? The uncertain relationship of unemployment and mortality. Centre for European Labour Market Research. 2007 Jun. (University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series; 22).
Bender, Keith A. ; Theodossiou, Ioannis. / Your job or your life? The uncertain relationship of unemployment and mortality. Centre for European Labour Market Research, 2007. (University of Aberdeen Business School Working Paper Series; 22).
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