220 Choice of UK Medical School Predicts Success in The Intercollegiate Membership of The Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS) Examination

R Ellis, D Scrimgeour, J Cleland, A Lee, P Brennan

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

Background UK medical schools vary in terms of factors such as mission, specific curricula and pedagogy. As relatively little is understood about the impact of these differences at a post-graduate level, we examined the relationship between medical school and MRCS success. Method Using the UKMED database we analysed data on UK medical graduates who attempted MRCS Part A (n = 9729) and MRCS Part B (n = 4644) between 2007-2017. Univariate analysis characterised the relationship between medical school and first attempt MRCS success. Logistic regression modelling identified independent predictors of MRCS success. Results MRCS pass rates differed significantly between medical schools (P < 0.001). Trainees from standard-entry 5-year programmes were more likely to pass MRCS at first attempt compared to those from extended (Gateway) courses ((Part A (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.72 [95% Confidence Interval (CI) 2.69-5.15]); Part B (OR 1.67 [1.02-2.76])). Non-graduates were more likely to pass Part A (OR 1.40 [1.19-1.64]) and Part B (OR 1.66 [1.24-2.24]). Russell Group graduates were more likely to pass MRCS Part A (OR 1.79 [1.56-2.05]) and Part B (OR 1.24 [1.03-1.49])). Conclusions Medical programme and medical school are associated with MRCS success. Further research is needed to tease out the relationship between individual factors, medical school and MRCS performance.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberznab134.538
Number of pages1
JournalBritish Journal of Surgery
Volume108
Issue numberSupplement_2
Early online date4 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

Keywords

  • Schools
  • univariate analysis
  • medical teaching

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