Additive genetic variance, heritability, and inbreeding depression in male extra-pair reproductive success

Jane M. Reid, Peter Arcese, Rebecca J. Sardell, Lukas F. Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hypothesis that female extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous animals reflects indirect genetic benefits requires that there be additive and/or nonadditive genetic variance in fitness. However, the specific hypotheses that male extra-pair reproductive success (EPRS) shows additive genetic variance (VA), heritability (h(2)), or inbreeding depression, and hence that females could acquire indirect genetic benefits through increased EPRS of sons, have not been explicitly tested. We used comprehensive genetic pedigree data from song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to estimate V-A, h(2), and inbreeding depression in the number of extra-pair offspring a male sired per year and the probability that a male would sire any extra-pair offspring per year. Inbreeding depression was substantial: more inbred males sired fewer extra-pair offspring and were less likely to sire any extra-pair offspring. In contrast, estimates of V-A and h(2) were close to 0, although 95% credible intervals were relatively wide. These data suggest that females could accrue indirect genetic benefits, in terms of increased EPRS of outbred sons, by mating with unrelated social or extra-pair mates. In contrast, any indirect benefit of extra-pair reproduction in terms of producing sons with high additive genetic value for EPRS is most likely to be small.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-187
Number of pages11
JournalThe American Naturalist
Volume177
Issue number2
Early online date12 Jan 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

Keywords

  • Bayesian animal model
  • compatible genes
  • extra-pair paternity
  • good genes
  • mate choice
  • multiple mating
  • sexual selection
  • sparrows melospiza-melodia
  • sperm competition
  • song sparrows
  • quantitative genetics
  • natural-population
  • life-history
  • drosophila-melanogaster

Cite this

Additive genetic variance, heritability, and inbreeding depression in male extra-pair reproductive success. / Reid, Jane M.; Arcese, Peter; Sardell, Rebecca J.; Keller, Lukas F.

In: The American Naturalist, Vol. 177, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 177-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reid, Jane M. ; Arcese, Peter ; Sardell, Rebecca J. ; Keller, Lukas F. / Additive genetic variance, heritability, and inbreeding depression in male extra-pair reproductive success. In: The American Naturalist. 2011 ; Vol. 177, No. 2. pp. 177-187.
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