An alternative model of special education teacher education socialization

Kathryn Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The process of organizational socialization sheds light on the difficulty of a university program to effectively socialize its specialeducationteacher candidates into believing and acting on theories of inclusion for students with disabilities in public schools. In general, people are socialized by prior experiences, then the university, then the workplace. In this case, the workplace socialization exists prior to participation in the university setting and in conjunction with it potentially complicating traditional university socialization. This study explores how prospective specialeducationteachers in a moderate/severe specialeducationteacher credential program adopt, adapt, and redefine the concept of inclusion. An analysis of their use of the term “inclusion” in semi-structured interviews draws attention to the degree to which they have or have not been socialized into believing and acting on inclusion at their schools.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)901-914
Number of pages14
JournalTeaching and Teacher Education
Volume24
Issue number4
Early online date21 Sep 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2008

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special education
socialization
inclusion
university
teacher
education
workplace
school
candidacy
disability
participation
interview
experience
student

Keywords

  • teacher education
  • special education
  • socialization
  • teacher preparation
  • inclusion

Cite this

An alternative model of special education teacher education socialization. / Young, Kathryn.

In: Teaching and Teacher Education, Vol. 24, No. 4, 05.2008, p. 901-914.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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