Arab Publics Continue to See Women as Second-Class Citizens

Research output: Non-textual formWebsite, Blog, Social Media

Abstract

During the Arab Uprisings in 2011 women as well as men engaged in political activism, on the streets and virtually. Some thought that after the Uprisings the Arab public would be more willing to accept the rights of women. However, this seems to have been a forlorn hope.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationCanberra, Australia
PublisherInstitute for Governance & Policy Analysis University of Canberra
EditionThe Policy Space
Media of outputOnline
Size1000 words
Publication statusPublished - 29 May 2017

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Keywords

  • Arab Spring
  • Arab Uprisings
  • Gender
  • Middle East
  • women's rights

Cite this

Teti, A. (Author), & Abbott, P. A. (Author). (2017). Arab Publics Continue to See Women as Second-Class Citizens. Website, Blog, Social Media, Canberra, Australia: Institute for Governance & Policy Analysis University of Canberra. Retrieved from http://www.thepolicyspace.com.au/2017/29/196-arab-publics-continue-to-see-women-as-second-class-citizens
Arab Publics Continue to See Women as Second-Class Citizens. Teti, Andrea (Author); Abbott, Pamela Ann (Author). 2017. Canberra, Australia : Institute for Governance & Policy Analysis University of Canberra.

Research output: Non-textual formWebsite, Blog, Social Media

Teti, A & Abbott, PA, Arab Publics Continue to See Women as Second-Class Citizens, 2017, Website, Blog, Social Media, Institute for Governance & Policy Analysis University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia.
Teti A (Author), Abbott PA (Author). Arab Publics Continue to See Women as Second-Class Citizens Canberra, Australia: Institute for Governance & Policy Analysis University of Canberra. 2017.
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