Availability of blueberry phenolics for microbial metabolism in the colon and the potential inflammatory implications

Wendy Roslyn Russell, Aurélie Labat, Lorraine Scobbie, Sylvia Helen Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blueberries are a rich source of phenylpropanoid-derived phytochemicals, widely studied for their potential health benefits. Of particular interest for colonic health are the lower molecular weight phenolic acids and their derivatives, as these are the predominant phenolic compounds detected in the colon. Blueberries contained a wide variety of phenolic acids, the majority of which (3371.14 ± 422.30 mg/kg compared to 205.06 ± 45.34 mg/kg for the free phenolic acids) were attached to other plant cell-wall components and therefore, likely to become available in the colon. Cytokine-induced stimulation of the inflammatory pathways in colon cells was four-fold up-regulated in the presence of the free phenolic acid fraction. Incubation of the bound phenolic acids with human faecal slurries resulted in qualitative and quantitative differences in the phenolic compounds recovered. The metabolites obtained by incubation with faecal slurries from one volunteer significantly decreased (1.67 ± 0.69 ng/cm3) prostanoid production, whereas an increase (10.78 ± 5.54 ng/cm3) was obtained with faecal slurries from another volunteer. These results suggest that any potential protective effect of blueberry phenolics as anti-inflammatory agents in the colon is a likely result of microbial metabolism. Studies addressing a wide-range of well-characterised human volunteers will be required before such health claims can be fully established.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)726-731
Number of pages6
JournalMolecular Nutrition & Food Research
Volume51
Issue number6
Early online date9 May 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

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Blueberry Plants
blueberries
phenolic acids
colon
Colon
slurries
metabolism
volunteers
Volunteers
phenolic compounds
anti-inflammatory agents
health claims
Health
Plant Cells
Phytochemicals
phenylpropanoids
cell wall components
Insurance Benefits
Cellular Structures
Cell Wall

Keywords

  • colon cancer
  • inflammation
  • nutrition
  • phytochemicals
  • prostanoids

Cite this

Availability of blueberry phenolics for microbial metabolism in the colon and the potential inflammatory implications. / Russell, Wendy Roslyn; Labat, Aurélie; Scobbie, Lorraine; Duncan, Sylvia Helen.

In: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, Vol. 51, No. 6, 06.2007, p. 726-731.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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