Beyond upland exclosures

what is the effect of low-intensity grazing on carbon storage?

Stuart William Smith, Charlotte Vandenberghe,, Astley Francis St John Hastings, David Johnson, Robin Pakeman, Rene Van Der Wal, Sarah Jane Woodin

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Land management is a key control of terrestrial carbon (C) storage and can be used to mitigate rising CO2 emissions. The UK uplands hold approximately one-third of national terrestrial C in their soils. The dominant land-use is extensive livestock grazing management. However, our understanding of the impact of grazing on upland C storage is limited to studies comparing the presence versus the absence of herbivores. Utilising a grazing density manipulation we show no sheep and low-intensity sheep grazing provide similar benefits, in that they enhance plant and soil C accumulation. In contrast, under high-intensity sheep grazing there is a net loss in predicted soil C accumulation. We propose that low-intensity sheep grazing is optimal to sustain the diversity of key upland species, compared to high-intensity grazing and no sheep. We provide evidence that low-intensity sheep grazing can be used to minimise trade-offs between multiple upland land-use objectives, namely species conservation.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventSRUC and SEPA Biennial Conference - Agriculture and the Environment X - Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 15 Apr 2014 → …

Conference

ConferenceSRUC and SEPA Biennial Conference - Agriculture and the Environment X
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period15/04/14 → …

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carbon sequestration
sheep
grazing
land use
grazing management
species conservation
soil
effect
land management
livestock
herbivore
carbon

Cite this

Smith, S. W., Vandenberghe, C., Hastings, A. F. S. J., Johnson, D., Pakeman, R., Van Der Wal, R., & Woodin, S. J. (2014). Beyond upland exclosures: what is the effect of low-intensity grazing on carbon storage?. Paper presented at SRUC and SEPA Biennial Conference - Agriculture and the Environment X, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Beyond upland exclosures : what is the effect of low-intensity grazing on carbon storage? / Smith, Stuart William; Vandenberghe, Charlotte; Hastings, Astley Francis St John; Johnson, David; Pakeman, Robin; Van Der Wal, Rene; Woodin, Sarah Jane.

2014. Paper presented at SRUC and SEPA Biennial Conference - Agriculture and the Environment X, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Smith, SW, Vandenberghe, C, Hastings, AFSJ, Johnson, D, Pakeman, R, Van Der Wal, R & Woodin, SJ 2014, 'Beyond upland exclosures: what is the effect of low-intensity grazing on carbon storage?' Paper presented at SRUC and SEPA Biennial Conference - Agriculture and the Environment X, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 15/04/14, .
Smith SW, Vandenberghe, C, Hastings AFSJ, Johnson D, Pakeman R, Van Der Wal R et al. Beyond upland exclosures: what is the effect of low-intensity grazing on carbon storage?. 2014. Paper presented at SRUC and SEPA Biennial Conference - Agriculture and the Environment X, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Smith, Stuart William ; Vandenberghe, Charlotte ; Hastings, Astley Francis St John ; Johnson, David ; Pakeman, Robin ; Van Der Wal, Rene ; Woodin, Sarah Jane. / Beyond upland exclosures : what is the effect of low-intensity grazing on carbon storage?. Paper presented at SRUC and SEPA Biennial Conference - Agriculture and the Environment X, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
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