Bone, muscle, and physical activity

structural equation modeling of relationships and genetic influence with age

Dean H Lang, David E Conroy, Arimantas Lionikas, Holly A Mack, Lars Larsson, George P Vogler, David J Vandenbergh, David A Blizard, Gerald E McClearn, Neil A Sharkey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Correlations among bone strength, muscle mass, and physical activity suggest that these traits may be modulated by each other and/or by common genetic and/or environmental mechanisms. This study used structural equation modeling (SEM) to explore the extent to which select genetic loci manifest their pleiotropic effects through functional adaptations commonly referred to as Wolff's law. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was used to identify regions of chromosomes that simultaneously influenced skeletal mechanics, muscle mass, and/or activity-related behaviors in young and aged B6xD2 second-generation (F(2)) mice of both sexes. SEM was used to further study relationships among select QTLs, bone mechanics, muscle mass, and measures of activity. The SEM approach provided the means to numerically decouple the musculoskeletal effects of mechanical loading from the effects of other physiological processes involved in locomotion and physical activity. It was found that muscle mass was a better predictor of bone mechanics in young females, whereas mechanical loading was a better predictor of bone mechanics in older females. An activity-induced loading factor positively predicted the mechanical behavior of hindlimb bones in older males; contrarily, load-free locomotion (i.e., the remaining effects after removing the effects of loading) negatively predicted bone performance. QTLs on chromosomes 4, 7, and 9 seem to exert some of their influence on bone through actions consistent with Wolff's Law. Further exploration of these and other mechanisms through which genes function will aid in development of individualized interventions able to exploit the numerous complex pathways contributing to skeletal health.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1608-1617
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume24
Issue number9
Early online date27 Apr 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Bone and Bones
Muscles
Mechanics
Locomotion
Physiological Phenomena
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7
Genetic Loci
Quantitative Trait Loci
Muscle Strength
Hindlimb
Skeletal Muscle
Chromosomes
Health
Genes

Keywords

  • age factors
  • animals
  • biomechanics
  • bone and bones
  • female
  • male
  • mice
  • mice, inbred C57BL
  • mice, inbred DBA
  • models, biological
  • muscles
  • organ size
  • physical conditioning, animal
  • quantitative trait loci
  • structural equation modeling
  • bone mechanics
  • physical activity

Cite this

Bone, muscle, and physical activity : structural equation modeling of relationships and genetic influence with age. / Lang, Dean H; Conroy, David E; Lionikas, Arimantas; Mack, Holly A; Larsson, Lars; Vogler, George P; Vandenbergh, David J; Blizard, David A; McClearn, Gerald E; Sharkey, Neil A.

In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Vol. 24, No. 9, 09.2009, p. 1608-1617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lang, DH, Conroy, DE, Lionikas, A, Mack, HA, Larsson, L, Vogler, GP, Vandenbergh, DJ, Blizard, DA, McClearn, GE & Sharkey, NA 2009, 'Bone, muscle, and physical activity: structural equation modeling of relationships and genetic influence with age', Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 1608-1617. https://doi.org/10.1359/jbmr.090418
Lang, Dean H ; Conroy, David E ; Lionikas, Arimantas ; Mack, Holly A ; Larsson, Lars ; Vogler, George P ; Vandenbergh, David J ; Blizard, David A ; McClearn, Gerald E ; Sharkey, Neil A. / Bone, muscle, and physical activity : structural equation modeling of relationships and genetic influence with age. In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 1608-1617.
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