Brain hyperintensity location determines outcome in the triad of impaired cognition, physical health and depressive symptoms

A cohort study in late life

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Abstract

Purpose of the studyBrain hyperintensities, detectable with MRI, increase with age. They are associated with a triad of impairment in cognitive ability, depression and physical health. Here we test the hypothesis that the association between hyperintensities and cognitive ability, physical health and depressive symptoms depends on lesion location.
Design and methods244 members of the Aberdeen 1936 Birth Cohort were recruited to this study. 227 participants completed brain MRI and their hyperintensities were scored using Scheltens’s scale. 205 had complete imaging, cognitive, physical health and depressive symptom score data. The relationships between hyperintensity location and depressive symptoms, cognitive ability and physical health were examined by correlation and structural equation analysis.
ResultsWe found that depressive symptoms correlated with hyperintensity burden in the grey matter (r = 0.14, p = 0.04) and infratentorial regions (r = 0.17, p = 0.01). Infratentorial hyperintensities correlated with reduced peak expiratory flow rate (r = −0.26, p < 0.001) and impaired gait (r = 0.13, p = 0.05). No relationship was found between white matter and periventricular (supratentoral) hyperintensities and depressive symptoms. Hyperintensities in the supratentorial and infratentorial regions were associated with reduced cognitive performance. Using structural equation modelling we found that the association between hyperintensities and depressive symptoms was mediated by negative effects on physical health and cognitive ability.
ConclusionsHyperintensities in deep brain structures are associated with depressive symptoms, mediated via impaired physical health and cognitive ability. Participants with higher cognitive ability and better physical health are at lower risk of depressive symptoms.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-54
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume63
Early online date19 Oct 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016

Fingerprint

Cognition
cognitive ability
cognition
brain
Aptitude
Cohort Studies
Depression
Health
Brain
health
structural analysis
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Gait
Parturition
performance

Keywords

  • white matter hyperintensities
  • physical health
  • frailty
  • depression
  • cognition
  • cohort

Cite this

@article{8d1e8646545a4f6dbe2e419f0723d1ae,
title = "Brain hyperintensity location determines outcome in the triad of impaired cognition, physical health and depressive symptoms: A cohort study in late life",
abstract = "Purpose of the studyBrain hyperintensities, detectable with MRI, increase with age. They are associated with a triad of impairment in cognitive ability, depression and physical health. Here we test the hypothesis that the association between hyperintensities and cognitive ability, physical health and depressive symptoms depends on lesion location.Design and methods244 members of the Aberdeen 1936 Birth Cohort were recruited to this study. 227 participants completed brain MRI and their hyperintensities were scored using Scheltens’s scale. 205 had complete imaging, cognitive, physical health and depressive symptom score data. The relationships between hyperintensity location and depressive symptoms, cognitive ability and physical health were examined by correlation and structural equation analysis.ResultsWe found that depressive symptoms correlated with hyperintensity burden in the grey matter (r = 0.14, p = 0.04) and infratentorial regions (r = 0.17, p = 0.01). Infratentorial hyperintensities correlated with reduced peak expiratory flow rate (r = −0.26, p < 0.001) and impaired gait (r = 0.13, p = 0.05). No relationship was found between white matter and periventricular (supratentoral) hyperintensities and depressive symptoms. Hyperintensities in the supratentorial and infratentorial regions were associated with reduced cognitive performance. Using structural equation modelling we found that the association between hyperintensities and depressive symptoms was mediated by negative effects on physical health and cognitive ability.ConclusionsHyperintensities in deep brain structures are associated with depressive symptoms, mediated via impaired physical health and cognitive ability. Participants with higher cognitive ability and better physical health are at lower risk of depressive symptoms.",
keywords = "white matter hyperintensities, physical health, frailty, depression, cognition, cohort",
author = "Alison Murray and Chris McNeil and Sima Salarirad and Ian Deary and Louise Phillips and Lawrence Whalley and Roger Staff",
note = "The authors would like to thank the participants of the Aberdeen 1936 Birth Cohort (ABC36). Image acquisition and image analysis for ABC36 were funded by the Alzheimer’s Research Trust (now Alzheimer’s Research UK). A.D.M., C.J.M., S.S., L.J.W., and R.T.S. have received grants from: Chief Scientist Office, Department of Health, Scottish Government; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.archger.2015.10.004",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "49--54",
journal = "Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics",
issn = "0167-4943",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brain hyperintensity location determines outcome in the triad of impaired cognition, physical health and depressive symptoms

T2 - A cohort study in late life

AU - Murray, Alison

AU - McNeil, Chris

AU - Salarirad, Sima

AU - Deary, Ian

AU - Phillips, Louise

AU - Whalley, Lawrence

AU - Staff, Roger

N1 - The authors would like to thank the participants of the Aberdeen 1936 Birth Cohort (ABC36). Image acquisition and image analysis for ABC36 were funded by the Alzheimer’s Research Trust (now Alzheimer’s Research UK). A.D.M., C.J.M., S.S., L.J.W., and R.T.S. have received grants from: Chief Scientist Office, Department of Health, Scottish Government; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

PY - 2016/3

Y1 - 2016/3

N2 - Purpose of the studyBrain hyperintensities, detectable with MRI, increase with age. They are associated with a triad of impairment in cognitive ability, depression and physical health. Here we test the hypothesis that the association between hyperintensities and cognitive ability, physical health and depressive symptoms depends on lesion location.Design and methods244 members of the Aberdeen 1936 Birth Cohort were recruited to this study. 227 participants completed brain MRI and their hyperintensities were scored using Scheltens’s scale. 205 had complete imaging, cognitive, physical health and depressive symptom score data. The relationships between hyperintensity location and depressive symptoms, cognitive ability and physical health were examined by correlation and structural equation analysis.ResultsWe found that depressive symptoms correlated with hyperintensity burden in the grey matter (r = 0.14, p = 0.04) and infratentorial regions (r = 0.17, p = 0.01). Infratentorial hyperintensities correlated with reduced peak expiratory flow rate (r = −0.26, p < 0.001) and impaired gait (r = 0.13, p = 0.05). No relationship was found between white matter and periventricular (supratentoral) hyperintensities and depressive symptoms. Hyperintensities in the supratentorial and infratentorial regions were associated with reduced cognitive performance. Using structural equation modelling we found that the association between hyperintensities and depressive symptoms was mediated by negative effects on physical health and cognitive ability.ConclusionsHyperintensities in deep brain structures are associated with depressive symptoms, mediated via impaired physical health and cognitive ability. Participants with higher cognitive ability and better physical health are at lower risk of depressive symptoms.

AB - Purpose of the studyBrain hyperintensities, detectable with MRI, increase with age. They are associated with a triad of impairment in cognitive ability, depression and physical health. Here we test the hypothesis that the association between hyperintensities and cognitive ability, physical health and depressive symptoms depends on lesion location.Design and methods244 members of the Aberdeen 1936 Birth Cohort were recruited to this study. 227 participants completed brain MRI and their hyperintensities were scored using Scheltens’s scale. 205 had complete imaging, cognitive, physical health and depressive symptom score data. The relationships between hyperintensity location and depressive symptoms, cognitive ability and physical health were examined by correlation and structural equation analysis.ResultsWe found that depressive symptoms correlated with hyperintensity burden in the grey matter (r = 0.14, p = 0.04) and infratentorial regions (r = 0.17, p = 0.01). Infratentorial hyperintensities correlated with reduced peak expiratory flow rate (r = −0.26, p < 0.001) and impaired gait (r = 0.13, p = 0.05). No relationship was found between white matter and periventricular (supratentoral) hyperintensities and depressive symptoms. Hyperintensities in the supratentorial and infratentorial regions were associated with reduced cognitive performance. Using structural equation modelling we found that the association between hyperintensities and depressive symptoms was mediated by negative effects on physical health and cognitive ability.ConclusionsHyperintensities in deep brain structures are associated with depressive symptoms, mediated via impaired physical health and cognitive ability. Participants with higher cognitive ability and better physical health are at lower risk of depressive symptoms.

KW - white matter hyperintensities

KW - physical health

KW - frailty

KW - depression

KW - cognition

KW - cohort

U2 - 10.1016/j.archger.2015.10.004

DO - 10.1016/j.archger.2015.10.004

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 49

EP - 54

JO - Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

JF - Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

SN - 0167-4943

ER -