Building partnerships with communities for biodiversity conservation

lessons from Asian mountains

Charudutt Mishra, Juliette Claire Young, Matthias Fiechter, Brad Rutherford, Stephen Redpath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Applied ecology lies at the intersection of human societies and natural systems. Consequently, applied ecologists are constantly challenged as to how best to use ecological knowledge to influence the management of ecosystems (Habel et al. 2013). As Hulme (2011) has pointed out, to do so effectively we must leave our ivory towers and engage with stakeholders. This engagement is especially important and challenging in areas of the world where poverty, weak institutions and poor governance structures conspire to limit the ability of local communities to contribute to biodiversity conservation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1583-1591
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Ecology
Volume54
Issue number6
Early online date11 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

Fingerprint

poverty
stakeholder
biodiversity
mountain
ecosystem
society
world
applied ecology

Keywords

  • snow leopard
  • conservation
  • Panthera uncia
  • community engagement
  • partnership
  • conservation programmes
  • stakeholder engagement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Building partnerships with communities for biodiversity conservation : lessons from Asian mountains . / Mishra, Charudutt; Young, Juliette Claire; Fiechter, Matthias ; Rutherford, Brad; Redpath, Stephen.

In: Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 54, No. 6, 12.2017, p. 1583-1591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mishra, Charudutt ; Young, Juliette Claire ; Fiechter, Matthias ; Rutherford, Brad ; Redpath, Stephen. / Building partnerships with communities for biodiversity conservation : lessons from Asian mountains . In: Journal of Applied Ecology. 2017 ; Vol. 54, No. 6. pp. 1583-1591.
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