Changes in lifestyle habits and behaviours are associated with weight loss maintenance in members of a commercial weight loss organisation

R. J. Stubbs, A. McConnon, M. Gibbs, M. Raats, S. Whybrow

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

Abstract

This analysis examined the lifestyle correlates of weight loss maintenance in 1428 participants of a slimming organisation, who had been members for a mean ± SD of 16 ±16 months, had lost 13.8% ± 9.2% weight and were trying to maintain, or increase, their weight loss during a subsequent 6 month study period. Data were collected as part of the DiOGenes study1. Ethical approval was given by the University of Surrey Ethics Committee. Adults were recruited between August 2006 and July 2008 from Slimming World. Subjects completed lifestyle measures at two time points, measurement 1 (M1) at the start of the study and nominally six months later (measurement 2 (M2)). Participants’ weights (using calibrated scales) were taken from group records for M1, M2, six months before (measurement 0) and when they initially enrolled. They were free to continue following the weight-loss programme as they wished during this study, and there was no intervention other than completing the questionnaires. At M1 and M2 meal frequency (breakfast, lunch and dinner) and snacking between meals were assessed using a 5-point Likert scale (daily to
Original languageEnglish
Article numberE404
Number of pages1
JournalProceedings of the Nutrition Society
Volume70
Issue numberOCE6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Habits
Meals
Life Style
Weight Loss
Maintenance
Weight Reduction Programs
Weights and Measures
Lunch
Ethics Committees
Snacks
Breakfast
Surveys and Questionnaires

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Changes in lifestyle habits and behaviours are associated with weight loss maintenance in members of a commercial weight loss organisation. / Stubbs, R. J.; McConnon, A.; Gibbs, M.; Raats, M.; Whybrow, S.

In: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, Vol. 70, No. OCE6, E404, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

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