Disliked food acting as a contaminant during infancy: a disgust based motivation for rejection

S. D. Brown, G. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was conducted to examine whether disliked foods can act as contaminants to liked foods during infancy. Participants (aged 18-26 months, N=18) were offered a liked food that was touching a disliked food, on the same plate. Their response to this liked food was compared to the infants' response to a control condition; a liked food touching a second liked food. The data show that children were less likely to eat a liked food touching a disliked food, than a like-like control. Of the 18 infants tested, eight children either wanted the disliked food completely removed from the plate, or would not consume the liked food at all (N=2) once it was 'contaminated' by the disliked food. This study was the first to test the anecdotal reports that disliked foods can act as contaminants during infancy and the data offer some support for the hypothesis that disgust may influence the acceptance of food during early childhood.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-538
Number of pages4
JournalAppetite
Volume58
Issue number2
Early online date14 Jan 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

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Keywords

  • disgust
  • infant/child eating behaviours
  • Food neophobia
  • contamination
  • contagion

Cite this

Disliked food acting as a contaminant during infancy : a disgust based motivation for rejection. / Brown, S. D.; Harris, G.

In: Appetite, Vol. 58, No. 2, 04.2012, p. 535-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, S. D. ; Harris, G. / Disliked food acting as a contaminant during infancy : a disgust based motivation for rejection. In: Appetite. 2012 ; Vol. 58, No. 2. pp. 535-538.
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