Early origins of obesity

I C McMillen, Clare Lesley Adam, B S Muhlhausler

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

154 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is evidence that changes in perinatal nutrition programme the development of relative fat mass and the regulation of appetite in adult life. These studies have been primarily in the rodent utilizing maternal overnutrition or undernutrition imposed at different stages of pregnancy and beyond, mapping of neuropeptide localization and activity and appropriate null mutant models. Whilst the rodent offers significant advantages in terms of a short gestation and the availability of useful transgenic and null mutant models, there are also advantages to using an animal model more akin to the human, in which all components of the 'fat-brain axis' are present before birth, such as the sheep. This review summarizes recent work on the expression and localization of the (appetite regulatory' peptides in the fetal rodent and sheep hypothalamus and their potential role in the early programming of postnatal appetite and obesity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-17
Number of pages9
JournalThe Journal of Physiology
Volume565
Issue number1
Early online date10 Feb 2005
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2005

Keywords

  • SERUM LEPTIN CONCENTRATIONS
  • NEUROPEPTIDE-Y-SYSTEM
  • INTRAUTERINE GROWTH-RETARDATION
  • MAINTENANCE ENERGY-REQUIREMENTS
  • HYPOTHALAMIC VMN NEURONS
  • AGOUTI-RELATED PEPTIDE
  • DIABETIC MOTHER RATS
  • X-LIKE ALTERATIONS
  • ADULT FEMALE RATS
  • BODY-MASS INDEX

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