Educational interventions for cancer pain

A systematic review of systematic reviews with nested narrative review of randomized controlled trials

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Abstract

Objectives

Educational interventions are one approach to improving cancer pain management. This review aims to determine whether educational interventions can improve cancer pain management and to characterize components of cancer pain educational interventions.

Methods

Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched. Systematic reviews that assessed educational interventions to improve cancer pain management were included. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from each review. A narrative approach was taken to summarizing the nature and components of interventions.

Results

Eight systematic reviews and 34 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were reviewed. Interventions targeting patients can achieve small to moderate reductions in pain intensity. Interventions targeting professionals can improve their knowledge but most trials have not assessed for resultant patient benefits. All interventions included at least one of seven core components: improving knowledge about the nature of cancer pain; aiding communication about cancer pain; enhancing pain assessment; improving analgesic prescribing; tackling barriers to analgesic non-adherence; teaching non-pharmacological pain management strategies; and promoting re-assessment.

Conclusions

Cancer pain educational interventions can improve pain outcomes. They are complex heterogeneous interventions which often contain a combination of active components.

Practice implications

Suggestions are made to aid the development of future interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-282
Number of pages14
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume98
Issue number3
Early online date18 Nov 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015

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Randomized Controlled Trials
Pain Management
Pain
Analgesics
Pain Measurement
Cancer Pain
Teaching
Communication
Databases

Keywords

  • cancer
  • pain
  • pain education
  • professional education
  • carer education

Cite this

@article{a0e960d84b40445c9b52b1ecd6ea55a5,
title = "Educational interventions for cancer pain: A systematic review of systematic reviews with nested narrative review of randomized controlled trials",
abstract = "ObjectivesEducational interventions are one approach to improving cancer pain management. This review aims to determine whether educational interventions can improve cancer pain management and to characterize components of cancer pain educational interventions.MethodsMedline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched. Systematic reviews that assessed educational interventions to improve cancer pain management were included. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from each review. A narrative approach was taken to summarizing the nature and components of interventions.ResultsEight systematic reviews and 34 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were reviewed. Interventions targeting patients can achieve small to moderate reductions in pain intensity. Interventions targeting professionals can improve their knowledge but most trials have not assessed for resultant patient benefits. All interventions included at least one of seven core components: improving knowledge about the nature of cancer pain; aiding communication about cancer pain; enhancing pain assessment; improving analgesic prescribing; tackling barriers to analgesic non-adherence; teaching non-pharmacological pain management strategies; and promoting re-assessment.ConclusionsCancer pain educational interventions can improve pain outcomes. They are complex heterogeneous interventions which often contain a combination of active components.Practice implicationsSuggestions are made to aid the development of future interventions.",
keywords = "cancer , pain, pain education, professional education, carer education",
author = "Rosalind Adam and Christine Bond and Peter Murchie",
note = "Dr Rosalind Adam completed this work during a clinical academic fellowship funded by NHS Education for Scotland (NES).",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2014.11.003",
language = "English",
volume = "98",
pages = "269--282",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "3",

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T1 - Educational interventions for cancer pain

T2 - A systematic review of systematic reviews with nested narrative review of randomized controlled trials

AU - Adam, Rosalind

AU - Bond, Christine

AU - Murchie, Peter

N1 - Dr Rosalind Adam completed this work during a clinical academic fellowship funded by NHS Education for Scotland (NES).

PY - 2015/3

Y1 - 2015/3

N2 - ObjectivesEducational interventions are one approach to improving cancer pain management. This review aims to determine whether educational interventions can improve cancer pain management and to characterize components of cancer pain educational interventions.MethodsMedline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched. Systematic reviews that assessed educational interventions to improve cancer pain management were included. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from each review. A narrative approach was taken to summarizing the nature and components of interventions.ResultsEight systematic reviews and 34 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were reviewed. Interventions targeting patients can achieve small to moderate reductions in pain intensity. Interventions targeting professionals can improve their knowledge but most trials have not assessed for resultant patient benefits. All interventions included at least one of seven core components: improving knowledge about the nature of cancer pain; aiding communication about cancer pain; enhancing pain assessment; improving analgesic prescribing; tackling barriers to analgesic non-adherence; teaching non-pharmacological pain management strategies; and promoting re-assessment.ConclusionsCancer pain educational interventions can improve pain outcomes. They are complex heterogeneous interventions which often contain a combination of active components.Practice implicationsSuggestions are made to aid the development of future interventions.

AB - ObjectivesEducational interventions are one approach to improving cancer pain management. This review aims to determine whether educational interventions can improve cancer pain management and to characterize components of cancer pain educational interventions.MethodsMedline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched. Systematic reviews that assessed educational interventions to improve cancer pain management were included. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from each review. A narrative approach was taken to summarizing the nature and components of interventions.ResultsEight systematic reviews and 34 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were reviewed. Interventions targeting patients can achieve small to moderate reductions in pain intensity. Interventions targeting professionals can improve their knowledge but most trials have not assessed for resultant patient benefits. All interventions included at least one of seven core components: improving knowledge about the nature of cancer pain; aiding communication about cancer pain; enhancing pain assessment; improving analgesic prescribing; tackling barriers to analgesic non-adherence; teaching non-pharmacological pain management strategies; and promoting re-assessment.ConclusionsCancer pain educational interventions can improve pain outcomes. They are complex heterogeneous interventions which often contain a combination of active components.Practice implicationsSuggestions are made to aid the development of future interventions.

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KW - pain

KW - pain education

KW - professional education

KW - carer education

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JO - Patient Education and Counseling

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