Effects of increasing increments of fat- and sugar-rich snacks in the diet on energy and macronutrient intake in lean and overweight men

Nik Mazlan, Graham Horgan, Stephen Whybrow, Richard James Stubbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two studies have examined the effect on energy intake and macronutrient selection of increasing increments of mandatory high-fat or high-sugar snacks into the diet in men. The present study used a within-subject, repeated-measures design. In each experiment, six lean and six overweight, unrestrained men were each studied over three 7 d treatment periods, during which they were given mandatory snacks of the same energy density (550 kJ/100 g) comprising the following (in terms of percentage energy as fat-carbohydrate-protein): high-fat, 80:10:10; high-sugar, 10:80:10, of which 65 % was sugar, and 15 % starch. Subjects were given 0, 1.5 or 3.0 MJ/d snacks, in a randomised counterbalanced design, to be consumed mid-morning and mid-afternoon. Throughout each day, subjects had access ad libitum to fifteen high-protein, fifteen high-fat and fifteen high-carbohydrate foods, rotated on a 3 d menu. Mandatory high-fat snacks significantly elevated energy intake and fat intake, whereas high-sugar snacks elevated energy intake and carbohydrate intake (all P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)596-606
Number of pages11
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume96
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Appetite
  • Body Weight
  • Dietary Carbohydrates
  • Dietary Fats
  • Dietary Proteins
  • Eating
  • Energy Intake
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Food Preferences
  • Humans
  • Hunger
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Motivation
  • Overweight
  • Questionnaires
  • Thinness

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