Elite school capitals and girls’ schooling

understanding the (re)production of privilege through a habitus of ‘assuredness’

Joan Forbes, Bob Lingard

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concept of agency has long been drawn upon – overtly or implicitly – in contemporary social theory. However, theory shapes how human agency and its determinants are understood and can be built upon. The last few years have seen growing interest in notions of privilege and affect. How might these newer concepts affect our understanding of agency? Does human agency need to make new modes of sociability possible, and how does privilege constrain or facilitate possibilities for social change? Privilege, Agency and Affect seeks to answer some of these questions, showcasing recent work by UK, North American, Australasian and Scandinavian writers at the cutting edge of sociology, social theory and education. Strongly empirical as well as theoretical in the approach taken, it offers a timely extension of foundations laid in early 21st century social theory and debate.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPrivilege, agency and affect
Subtitle of host publicationunderstanding the production and effects of action
EditorsClaire Maxwell, Peter Aggleton
Place of PublicationLondon/New York
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages50-68
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)978-1-137-29262-9, 1-137-29262-8
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

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privilege
elite
school
sociability
social change
sociology
writer
determinants
education

Keywords

  • privilege
  • agency
  • affect
  • elite schooling
  • Bourdieuian capitals
  • advantage

Cite this

Forbes, J., & Lingard, B. (2013). Elite school capitals and girls’ schooling: understanding the (re)production of privilege through a habitus of ‘assuredness’. In C. Maxwell, & P. Aggleton (Eds.), Privilege, agency and affect: understanding the production and effects of action (pp. 50-68). London/New York: Palgrave Macmillan .

Elite school capitals and girls’ schooling : understanding the (re)production of privilege through a habitus of ‘assuredness’. / Forbes, Joan; Lingard, Bob.

Privilege, agency and affect: understanding the production and effects of action. ed. / Claire Maxwell; Peter Aggleton. London/New York : Palgrave Macmillan , 2013. p. 50-68.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Forbes, J & Lingard, B 2013, Elite school capitals and girls’ schooling: understanding the (re)production of privilege through a habitus of ‘assuredness’. in C Maxwell & P Aggleton (eds), Privilege, agency and affect: understanding the production and effects of action. Palgrave Macmillan , London/New York, pp. 50-68.
Forbes J, Lingard B. Elite school capitals and girls’ schooling: understanding the (re)production of privilege through a habitus of ‘assuredness’. In Maxwell C, Aggleton P, editors, Privilege, agency and affect: understanding the production and effects of action. London/New York: Palgrave Macmillan . 2013. p. 50-68
Forbes, Joan ; Lingard, Bob. / Elite school capitals and girls’ schooling : understanding the (re)production of privilege through a habitus of ‘assuredness’. Privilege, agency and affect: understanding the production and effects of action. editor / Claire Maxwell ; Peter Aggleton. London/New York : Palgrave Macmillan , 2013. pp. 50-68
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