Examining the Irish connection in the southern American fiddle repertoire

Paul Wells

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Abstract

Two or three years ago at the annual Breakin’ Up Winter old-time music festival, an event held every March at Cedars of Lebanon State Park near Lebanon, Tennessee, I was playing guitar in a nice jam session led by two fiddler friends. At my request we played ‘Indian Ate the Woodchuck’, a driving three-strain tune associated with the legendary eastern Kentucky fiddler, Ed Haley.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationÓn gCos go Cluas
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Dancing to Listening
EditorsLiz Doherty, Fintan Vallely
PublisherAberdeen University Press
Chapter32
Pages275-283
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)978-1-85752-073-6
Publication statusPublished - 2019
EventNorth Atlantic Fiddle Convention Conference - Northern Ireland, Derry/Londonderry, United Kingdom
Duration: 27 Jun 20121 Jul 2012

Publication series

NameFiddle and Dance Studies from around the North Atlantic 5

Conference

ConferenceNorth Atlantic Fiddle Convention Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityDerry/Londonderry
Period27/06/121/07/12

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  • Cite this

    Wells, P. (2019). Examining the Irish connection in the southern American fiddle repertoire. In L. Doherty, & F. Vallely (Eds.), Ón gCos go Cluas: From Dancing to Listening (pp. 275-283). (Fiddle and Dance Studies from around the North Atlantic 5). Aberdeen University Press.