Fate of hydrophobic compounds in the soil environment

J. D. Stokes, Graeme Iain Paton, K. T. Semple

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Soils contaminated with organic chemicals are now widespread in industrialized and developing countries, and the risk assessment and remediation of such contaminated sites is a priority. However, containment and remediation strategies are complicated in many cases by the range of contaminants present and the historical nature of the contamination. Research has increased our understanding of the behaviour of organic contaminants in soil and the factors that control their behaviour. There is a fundamental need to understand and, where possible, quantify the bioavailable fraction as well as the total concentration of contaminant present in soil: the bioavailable fraction is key to toxicity or biodegradation. To quantify these fractions, a large number of techniques have been employed, ranging from organic and aqueous based solvent extractions to the use of biota. Many studies have been carried out investigating the use of chemical techniques to describe bioavailability, which could be used in the assessment and remediation of contaminated land. The aim of this review is to consider the behaviour of organic contaminants in soil, highlighting issues of bioavailability, and then to discuss the relevance of the various methods for assessing risk and potential remediation of organic contaminants in soil.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)475-486
Number of pages11
JournalSoil Use & Management
Volume21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

Keywords

  • hydrophobic organic contaminants
  • extractability
  • bioavailability
  • contaminated land
  • bioremediation
  • POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS
  • ACCELERATED SOLVENT-EXTRACTION
  • CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS-SPECTROMETRY
  • SUPERCRITICAL-FLUID EXTRACTION
  • PRESSURIZED LIQUID EXTRACTION
  • SUBCRITICAL WATER EXTRACTION
  • PREDICT BIOAVAILABILITY
  • PAH BIOAVAILABILITY
  • ACID HERBICIDES
  • SORPTION

Cite this

Fate of hydrophobic compounds in the soil environment. / Stokes, J. D.; Paton, Graeme Iain; Semple, K. T.

In: Soil Use & Management, Vol. 21, 12.2005, p. 475-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stokes, J. D. ; Paton, Graeme Iain ; Semple, K. T. / Fate of hydrophobic compounds in the soil environment. In: Soil Use & Management. 2005 ; Vol. 21. pp. 475-486.
@article{ba3b6b9a30dc441fba3894777fed7fe6,
title = "Fate of hydrophobic compounds in the soil environment",
abstract = "Soils contaminated with organic chemicals are now widespread in industrialized and developing countries, and the risk assessment and remediation of such contaminated sites is a priority. However, containment and remediation strategies are complicated in many cases by the range of contaminants present and the historical nature of the contamination. Research has increased our understanding of the behaviour of organic contaminants in soil and the factors that control their behaviour. There is a fundamental need to understand and, where possible, quantify the bioavailable fraction as well as the total concentration of contaminant present in soil: the bioavailable fraction is key to toxicity or biodegradation. To quantify these fractions, a large number of techniques have been employed, ranging from organic and aqueous based solvent extractions to the use of biota. Many studies have been carried out investigating the use of chemical techniques to describe bioavailability, which could be used in the assessment and remediation of contaminated land. The aim of this review is to consider the behaviour of organic contaminants in soil, highlighting issues of bioavailability, and then to discuss the relevance of the various methods for assessing risk and potential remediation of organic contaminants in soil.",
keywords = "hydrophobic organic contaminants, extractability, bioavailability, contaminated land, bioremediation, POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS, ACCELERATED SOLVENT-EXTRACTION, CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS-SPECTROMETRY, SUPERCRITICAL-FLUID EXTRACTION, PRESSURIZED LIQUID EXTRACTION, SUBCRITICAL WATER EXTRACTION, PREDICT BIOAVAILABILITY, PAH BIOAVAILABILITY, ACID HERBICIDES, SORPTION",
author = "Stokes, {J. D.} and Paton, {Graeme Iain} and Semple, {K. T.}",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1079/SUM2005347",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "475--486",
journal = "Soil Use & Management",
issn = "0266-0032",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fate of hydrophobic compounds in the soil environment

AU - Stokes, J. D.

AU - Paton, Graeme Iain

AU - Semple, K. T.

PY - 2005/12

Y1 - 2005/12

N2 - Soils contaminated with organic chemicals are now widespread in industrialized and developing countries, and the risk assessment and remediation of such contaminated sites is a priority. However, containment and remediation strategies are complicated in many cases by the range of contaminants present and the historical nature of the contamination. Research has increased our understanding of the behaviour of organic contaminants in soil and the factors that control their behaviour. There is a fundamental need to understand and, where possible, quantify the bioavailable fraction as well as the total concentration of contaminant present in soil: the bioavailable fraction is key to toxicity or biodegradation. To quantify these fractions, a large number of techniques have been employed, ranging from organic and aqueous based solvent extractions to the use of biota. Many studies have been carried out investigating the use of chemical techniques to describe bioavailability, which could be used in the assessment and remediation of contaminated land. The aim of this review is to consider the behaviour of organic contaminants in soil, highlighting issues of bioavailability, and then to discuss the relevance of the various methods for assessing risk and potential remediation of organic contaminants in soil.

AB - Soils contaminated with organic chemicals are now widespread in industrialized and developing countries, and the risk assessment and remediation of such contaminated sites is a priority. However, containment and remediation strategies are complicated in many cases by the range of contaminants present and the historical nature of the contamination. Research has increased our understanding of the behaviour of organic contaminants in soil and the factors that control their behaviour. There is a fundamental need to understand and, where possible, quantify the bioavailable fraction as well as the total concentration of contaminant present in soil: the bioavailable fraction is key to toxicity or biodegradation. To quantify these fractions, a large number of techniques have been employed, ranging from organic and aqueous based solvent extractions to the use of biota. Many studies have been carried out investigating the use of chemical techniques to describe bioavailability, which could be used in the assessment and remediation of contaminated land. The aim of this review is to consider the behaviour of organic contaminants in soil, highlighting issues of bioavailability, and then to discuss the relevance of the various methods for assessing risk and potential remediation of organic contaminants in soil.

KW - hydrophobic organic contaminants

KW - extractability

KW - bioavailability

KW - contaminated land

KW - bioremediation

KW - POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS

KW - ACCELERATED SOLVENT-EXTRACTION

KW - CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS-SPECTROMETRY

KW - SUPERCRITICAL-FLUID EXTRACTION

KW - PRESSURIZED LIQUID EXTRACTION

KW - SUBCRITICAL WATER EXTRACTION

KW - PREDICT BIOAVAILABILITY

KW - PAH BIOAVAILABILITY

KW - ACID HERBICIDES

KW - SORPTION

U2 - 10.1079/SUM2005347

DO - 10.1079/SUM2005347

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 475

EP - 486

JO - Soil Use & Management

JF - Soil Use & Management

SN - 0266-0032

ER -