Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress

Brice Enjalbert, Gary P Moran, Claire Vaughan, Tim Yeomans, Donna M MacCallum, Janet Quinn, David C Coleman, Alistair J P Brown, Derek J Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Candida albicans is more pathogenic than Candida dubliniensis. However, this disparity in virulence is surprising given the high level of sequence conservation and the wide range of phenotypic traits shared by these two species. Increased sensitivity to environmental stresses has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor to the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we investigated, in the first comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by transcriptional profiling, global gene expression in each species when grown under conditions in which the two species exhibit differential stress tolerance. The profiles revealed similar core responses to stresses in both species, but differences in the amplitude of the general transcriptional responses to thermal, salt and oxidative stress. Differences in the regulation of specific stress genes were observed between the two species. In particular, ENA21, encoding a sodium ion transporter, was strongly induced in C. albicans but not in C. dubliniensis. In addition, ENA21 was identified in a forward genetic screen for C. albicans genomic sequences that increase salt tolerance in C. dubliniensis. Introduction of a single copy of CaENA21 was subsequently shown to be sufficient to confer salt tolerance upon C. dubliniensis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)216-228
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular Microbiology
Volume72
Issue number1
Early online date23 Feb 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009

Fingerprint

Osmotic Pressure
Gene Expression Profiling
Candida albicans
Candida
Sodium
Genome
Ions
Salt-Tolerance
Virulence
Oxidative Stress
Salts
Hot Temperature
Genes

Keywords

  • animals
  • Candida albicans
  • DNA, fungal
  • female
  • fungal proteins
  • gene expression profiling
  • genome, fungal
  • mice
  • mice, inbred BALB C
  • oligonucleotide array sequence analysis
  • organic anion transporters, sodium-dependent
  • osmotic pressure
  • salt-tolerance
  • species specificity
  • virulence

Cite this

Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress. / Enjalbert, Brice; Moran, Gary P; Vaughan, Claire; Yeomans, Tim; MacCallum, Donna M; Quinn, Janet; Coleman, David C; Brown, Alistair J P; Sullivan , Derek J.

In: Molecular Microbiology, Vol. 72, No. 1, 04.2009, p. 216-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Candida albicans is more pathogenic than Candida dubliniensis. However, this disparity in virulence is surprising given the high level of sequence conservation and the wide range of phenotypic traits shared by these two species. Increased sensitivity to environmental stresses has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor to the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we investigated, in the first comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by transcriptional profiling, global gene expression in each species when grown under conditions in which the two species exhibit differential stress tolerance. The profiles revealed similar core responses to stresses in both species, but differences in the amplitude of the general transcriptional responses to thermal, salt and oxidative stress. Differences in the regulation of specific stress genes were observed between the two species. In particular, ENA21, encoding a sodium ion transporter, was strongly induced in C. albicans but not in C. dubliniensis. In addition, ENA21 was identified in a forward genetic screen for C. albicans genomic sequences that increase salt tolerance in C. dubliniensis. Introduction of a single copy of CaENA21 was subsequently shown to be sufficient to confer salt tolerance upon C. dubliniensis.",
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